Archive for the ‘Weekly Photo Challenge’ Tag

Weekly Photo Challenge: Misty   20 comments

After checking out Ailsa’s weekly photo challenge and finding it was Misty this week, I couldn’t resist!  Most of these are from the archive but are fairly recent images.  A couple are very recent, taken with my point and shoot.  Please note these are copyright-protected and not available for free download without my permission.  Click on the image to go to the main gallery page, and please contact me if you have any questions.  Thanks for looking and enjoy!

In spring, the forests of the western Cascade Range in the Pacific Northwest receive regular infusions of misty rain and fog.

In spring, the forests of the western Cascade Range in the Pacific Northwest receive regular infusions of misty rain and fog.

A fisherman tries his luck at Lost Lake in the dawn mist.

A fisherman tries his luck at Lost Lake in the dawn mist.

Mount Rainier emerges one foggy early morning at Reflection Lakes.

Mount Rainier emerges one foggy early morning at Reflection Lakes.

Narada Falls at nightfall, Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington.

Narada Falls at nightfall, Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington.

Mist over Lost Lake, Oregon.

Mist over Lost Lake, Oregon.

Fog and mist are typical when venturing into the evergreen forests of the Pacific Northwest in winter.

Fog and mist are typical when venturing into the evergreen forests of the Pacific Northwest in winter.

On the Olympic Coast in Washington, mist and fog are common.

On the Olympic Coast in Washington, mist and fog are common.

Dark and mysterious:  Columbia River Gorge, Oregon.

Dark and mysterious: Columbia River Gorge, Oregon.

Mist and fog hang about the temples and pyramids of Tikal in Guatemala.

Mist and fog hang about the temples and pyramids of Tikal in Guatemala.

When waterfalls are in spring flood, mist fills the air, like here at Wahclella Falls in Oregon.

When waterfalls are in spring flood, mist fills the air, like here at Wahclella Falls in Oregon.

The rugged coastlline at Big Sur, California.

The rugged coastlline at Big Sur, California.

The thermal areas of Yellowstone on cold mornings are comparatively warm, misty magnets for buffalo.

The thermal areas of Yellowstone on cold mornings are comparatively warm, misty magnets for buffalo.

As the dawn mist begins lifting, a pond in the Montana high country begs to be fished.

As the dawn mist begins lifting, a pond in the Montana high country begs to be fished.

 

Sun vs. fog in a redwood forest, northern California.

Sun vs. fog in a redwood forest, northern California.

At sunset, mist and fog fill Oregon's Columbia River Gorge behind Vista House.

At sunset, mist and fog fill Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge behind Vista House.

 

 

 

 

Weekly Photo Talk: Reflections   25 comments

Mount Rainier, Washington is reflected in the blue waters of Bench Lake.

Mount Rainier, Washington is reflected in the blue waters of Bench Lake.

This post dovetails with the weekly photo challenge – Reflections.  I’ll be brief and to the point.  Here are some things to keep in mind when photographing reflections.  By the way, all of the images here are copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission.  If you are interested in one, just click on it to go to the gallery part of my website.  If you have any questions or special requests, please contact me.  Thanks for your interest!

One of my favorite night images, the moon and Jupiter times two in Mt. Rainier's Reflection Lake.  Please click on image if interested in it.

One of my favorite night images, the moon and Jupiter times two in Mt. Rainier’s Reflection Lake. Please click on image if interested in it.

      • Seek out reflections, especially when the light is nice.  Don’t worry about being cliche or boring.  Reflections multiply a beautiful sky or other nicely lighted subject.  They add zing to any photo.  They also help to control contrasts, evening out the light and making exposure easier.
This scene had subtle, rather dim but beautiful light, and Lake Crescent (Olympic Peninsula, Washington) reflecting that light made the shot.

Lake Crescent on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington.  Light was subtle, rather dim but beautiful, and the reflection multiplied that light and made the shot.

      • Reflections can close shapes or complete patterns.  Just look at the image below and imagine how the shadow and mountain would look without the reflection.  They would make half a shape.
Appropriately named Blue Lake near Mt. Rainier, Washington.

Appropriately named Blue Lake near Mt. Rainier, Washington.

      • As always, variety is the spice.  In order to avoid the same old look of upside down subjects, move in close, angle your camera down to take in only the reflection, work the light and subject both.  Do abstracts and close-ups.  Try reflections off buildings and use bright rocks too.  For times when the reflection is disturbed by wind, view them as opportunities to get a different kind of shot.  Watch carefully what the light does as the wind blows.
These trees along the Columbia River are flooded in spring's high flows, creating the opportunity for an abstract-like composition.

These trees along the Columbia River are flooded in spring’s high flows, creating the opportunity for an abstract-like composition.

      • When you have a fairly standard situation, like for example a reflection of a mountain off a lake, try exposing for the reflection.  Put your camera on manual and point the center of frame at the brightest part of the reflection (or if that is very bright just to the side of it).  Set the aperture you want and then adjust shutter speed to center your light meter reading.  Then move the camera to recompose and get the shot you want.  Shoot and then review the image on the LCD, paying attention to the histogram.  You want to make sure the histogram isn’t climbing up the right edge (overexposure) or way too far over to the left (underexposure).
The Grand Tetons in Wyoming are reflected in a high alpine tarn.

The Grand Tetons in Wyoming are reflected in a high alpine tarn.

      • In general, reflections are a little dimmer than the light source.  Remember that when you’re using a graduated neutral density filter, whether in the field or on the computer later.  Using the example from the point above, keep the reflection from becoming brighter than the brightest areas of the sky.
Don't forget night-time reflections:  Milky Way over Mt. Adams, Washington.

Don’t forget night-time reflections: Milky Way over Mt. Adams, Washington.

      •  When the sun glints directly off the water, those often beautiful highlights are normally the same or very close to the brightness of the sun.  So if they are blown out, so that they make the histogram hit the right edge, don’t worry about it.  Just like you don’t worry about blowing out the sun, who cares if those details lack highlights?
A winter sunset from Timberline on Mount Hood, Oregon reflects from the snow.

A winter sunset from Timberline on Mount Hood, Oregon reflects from the snow.

      • When you are shooting reflections in windows or mirrors out on the street, pay special attention to everything in the frame.  Of course this is always a great idea, but it’s even more important with street shooting.  Now I know it’s very cool to be surprised later on the computer when you see something you hadn’t noticed at the time.  But in general you want to control what is appearing in your composition.  It pays to be very observant with reflections.

I hope you are blessed with great reflections on your upcoming photography forays.  In my opinion, they are worth their weight in gold.  I also hope your weekend is as beautiful as ours is in the Pacific Northwest.  The first weekend of spring, yippee!

This house and the Mendocino Coast (California) headland it sits on are reflected beautifully off wet sand.

This house and the Mendocino Coast (California) headland it sits on are reflected beautifully off wet sand.

Fall along the Animas River of New Mexico.

Fall along the Animas River of New Mexico.

A glorious sunset sky is reflected from the Columbia River in Oregon as a seal cruises by.

A glorious sunset sky is reflected from the Columbia River in Oregon as a seal cruises by.

Inside   43 comments

It’s been awhile since I’ve participated in a weekly photo challenge.  A difficult challenge for an outside photographer like me.  In fact I think the theme for me should be inside looking out!

If you’re interested in any of these images just click on them for purchase/download info.  These versions are too small and anyway are copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission, sorry.  Please contact me if you have any questions.  For many more takes on the theme, see Inside.  Let’s start with a few caves:

There are numerous sculpted caves in the granite of Baja California's desert.

There are numerous sculpted caves in the granite of Baja California’s desert.

A cave in southern Thailand features beautiful terraced speleothems.

A cave in southern Thailand features beautiful terraced speleothems.

Beach Cave

A beach cave on California’s Lost Coast.

And now inside a few interesting structures:

Inside a Buddhist Temple in Laos.

Inside a Buddhist Temple in Laos.

View from inside one of the colonial buildings surrounding the square in the town of Quetzaltenango ("Xela") in the Guatemalan highlands.

View from inside one of the colonial buildings surrounding the square in the town of Quetzaltenango (“Xela”) in the Guatemalan highlands.

In the little-visited Mayan ruins of Xpuhil in the southern Yucatan, Mexico, it's possible to climb up a dark passageway to a chamber with a high keyhole view out.

In the little-visited Mayan ruins of Xpuhil in the southern Yucatan, Mexico, it’s possible to climb up a dark passageway to a chamber with a high keyhole view out.

Couldn’t resist a peak inside a flower.  I feel so much the voyeur!

View inside a Spring Tulip.

View inside a Spring Tulip.

And finally, inside the landscape:

Inside aptly named Wall Street, Bryce Canyon, Utah

Inside aptly named Wall Street, Bryce Canyon, Utah

The sun peeks into the narrow confines of Antelope Canyon, Arizona.

The sun peeks into the narrow confines of Antelope Canyon, Arizona.

Inside the dense rain forest of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington on one of the many misty days.

Inside the dense rain forest of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington on one of the many misty days.

Inside the narrows of Oneonta Gorge in Oregon during high waters of spring.

Inside the narrows of Oneonta Gorge in Oregon during high waters of spring.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Focus   19 comments

A frog enjoys the shallows of Snow Lake at Mount Rainier National Park, Washington.

A frog enjoys the shallows of Snow Lake at Mount Rainier National Park, Washington.

I was inspired to do a rare Monday post by the Weekly Photo Challenge on WordPress.  Also, this week’s topic, focus, gives me a good excuse to post some of the close-up shots I captured during my recent trip to Rainier and Olympic National Parks in Washington state.  I had a great time up there photographing both the landscapes and small details of a beautiful corner of the country.

The mountain in the lake: Reflection Lakes at Mount Rainier National Park.

The mountain in the lake: Reflection Lakes at Mount Rainier National Park.

This challenge is deceptively simple.  Focus gives even experienced photographers fits on occasion.  I often take only a camera and lens on photo walks, no tripod.  My goal is to sharpen my creativity.  With no tripod and a lens choice of one, you need to improvise to get decent images.

Pasqueflower is a hairy beast!

Pasqueflower is a hairy beast!

For instance at Mount Rainier’s Paradise Park, which is the park’s most popular area, I didn’t want to be burdened.  I wanted to simply stroll through the wildflower meadows with only my camera and macro lens.  Doing macro with no tripod is definitely a challenge, and this time was no different.  But when I saw other photographers with heavy backpacks full of camera gear, tripods in tow, I felt very happy with my choice.

Tracking this interesting beetle was a challenge hand-held with macro lens.

Tracking this interesting beetle was a challenge hand-held with macro lens.

In the Olympics I hiked up to a popular waterfall, Sol Duc Falls.  While shooting this triple cascade, I noticed the wild huckleberries, along with some other kinds.  For some reason I was the only one who was partaking of these scrumptious trail-side treats.  I didn’t understand that, but I made sure to photograph the berries before plucking and popping them into my mouth.

A fresh huckleberry in Olympic National Park just before it became a snack.

A fresh huckleberry in Olympic National Park just before it became a snack.

Rain overnight and cloudy skies means perfect conditions for macro photography.

Rain overnight and cloudy skies means perfect conditions for macro photography.

I hope you enjoy the pictures.  Please note they are copyrighted and not available for free download, sorry.  Go ahead and click on the photos to be taken to my main gallery page, where purchase options are listed.  Please contact me if you have any questions.  Thanks for your interest.

Lupine in the morning dew, Mt. Rainier National Park.

Lupine in the morning dew, Mt. Rainier National Park.

The rainforest in Olympic National Park, Washington receives what it thrives on: water!

The rainforest in Olympic National Park, Washington receives what it thrives on: water!

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