Archive for the ‘plants’ Tag

In Praise of the Prickly Pear   8 comments

Hot pink prickly pear cactus bloom, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

Hot pink prickly pear cactus bloom, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

I recently realized something.  I have until recently avoided photographing a worthy subject just because it is common. It is the lowly beaver tail cactus, a member of the prickly pear family.  It grows across the interior western United States, touching the Pacific Coast in southern California.  It took quite awhile for me to come around on this rather unspectacular cactus.  But now I am taking the time to notice its subtle charm.

Beavertail cactus, a member of the pricklypear family, is a common sight in Snow Canyon State Park, Utah.

Beaver tail cactus, a member of the prickly pear family, is a common sight in Snow Canyon State Park, Utah.

You see, I’ve noticed that this plant and I have some things in common.  It is on the surface unpleasant when you first glance its way, having a heavily creased face and a generally sour appearance.  It’s also worth avoiding at certain times, such as early mornings before it’s had a cup of coffee.   But it cannot completely conceal a certain rough charm, when the light is right.  And its interior is pulpy and soft, in stark contrast to the face it shows to the general public.

The wrinkles of a prickly pear that has gone to purple in Zion Canyon, Utah.

The wrinkles of a prickly pear that has gone to purple in Zion Canyon, Utah.

More than once I’ve squatted down to look at something on the desert floor, and had my bottom stuck with the painful spines of a small prickly pear I hadn’t even noticed.  I’ve also been annoyed when huge prickly pears blocked my way, forcing me to detour.  In many drier areas of the American West, beaver tail is ubiquitous, the most common spiny succulent growing.

The plant can take on amazing colors, particularly just after flowering, or when it’s stressed and the chlorophyll drains out of its body.  When a plant loses its green chlorophyll, other pigments (such as anthocyanins) impart vibrant purples, pinks, reds and other shades.  In fact, this is precisely what happens when a leaf goes from green to red or yellow in autumn.

After the bloom: a prickly pear's dried flowers show their version of fall colors in Zion National Park, Utah.

After the bloom: a prickly pear’s dried flowers show their version of fall colors in Zion National Park, Utah.

Prickly pears are wrinkly and spiny, and the beaver tail is no exception.  The spines keep most animals from eating it (for the moisture it contains inside) and the wrinkles are an adaptation that lessens the drying effect of desert winds.  These features give it an interesting look when the light is right.  Like other photographers, I mostly have ignored the prickly pear.  That is until it blooms.

Springtime in the deserts of the American Southwest means hot pink beaver tail cactus are in bloom.

Springtime in the deserts of the American Southwest means hot pink beaver tail cactus are in bloom.

In the deserts of the southwestern U.S.A., prickly pear blooms in late March or April – springtime.  The amount of winter rainfall and other factors influence how showy the blooms are, but the size and color (usually pinkish) of the flowers never disappoints anyone.  It is only recently that I’ve begun to really see how beautiful it can be at other times of the year.

So here’s to our common beaver tail cactus.  I will never take it for granted again.

Beaver tail cactus grows abundantly in Snow Canyon State Park, Utah.

Beaver tail cactus grows abundantly in Snow Canyon State Park, Utah.

Frosty Photos   2 comments

Frost makes for beautiful close-up photography in the garden.

Frost makes for beautiful close-up photography in the garden.

This is a short post on a favorite winter-time photo subject of mine: frost.  I used my Canon 100 mm. macro lens for these shots, but a regular lens with close-focusing would work too.  I also sometimes use my Canon 500D close-up lens, which screws on like a filter.  Combined with a wide-angle lens it gives you the best of both worlds: close focusing and wide angle.  Your depth of field is limited though, just like with macro lenses.

Red berries make a festive frost-covered subject.

Red berries make a festive frost-covered subject.

The weather recently gave us cold fog that collected in the valleys overnight.  It does not often drop below freezing in Portland, Oregon, but when it does, the area’s heavy plant cover offers abundant opportunity for photos of frost-decorated plants.  I took these pictures in the gardens of my neighborhood, including my own, while walking my dog.  That is as simple as photo shoots come.

Frost coats a branch.

Crystalline frost coats a branch.

PHOTO HOW-TO

As with most macro shots, the right depth of field and the right background are your main concerns.  I shot these hand-held, an unnecessary challenge given the fact that there are these things called tripods.  What can I say, I like challenges.  Actually, there is a technique to this that will help when you are hand-holding shots of people and still life.  Set your lens on manual focus and frame your subject.  Set your focus manually, then move the camera (and your body if necessary) back and forth until you have your subject in perfect focus.  I like to use the focus confirmation light in my viewfinder to see when I have focus and can press the shutter.

If you want, you can try to use burst mode to increase the likelihood of a perfectly focused shot.  Burst mode seems a bit like cheating to me, and I only use it in special circumstances (such as action).  I see a lot of photographers shooting with burst on all their subjects.  That seems rather strange to me.  It’s as if they do not trust their ability to decide when to take the picture.  I think it’s a bad practice.  I will shoot a burst when a breeze is moving my macro subject, so I’m not anti-burst.  I just think you use burst with forethought, not in “spray and pray” mode with all your pictures.

Get out and shoot some winter macro!

Beautiful decorations on the garden plants are the result of a frosty January morning.

Beautiful decorations on the garden plants are the result of a frosty January morning.

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