Archive for the ‘mist’ Tag

Single-image Sunday: Danum Valley Magic   16 comments

Danum Valley, Borneo

Danum Valley, Borneo

I am posting this image because I need to post something.  I just completed a big post for this week’s Foto Talk.  It involved a lot of thought and about 6 hours of work.  You will never see it now and I won’t ever see it again either.  That’s because I thought it had been saved as a draft by WordPress but it was not.  Learn from my mistake and never ever trust WordPress to save any of your work online, no matter how many times it has worked correctly for you before.

I am going to figure out now how to do posts offline, separate from WordPress, and import them into the blog and have them look the way I want.  I tried this in the beginning and it was difficult to get the posts to look right.  But now I find it is necessary to really learn this before doing any more blogging.  All it takes is once to waste hours of work and have it come to nothing for you to commit to doing things differently.  So never trust WordPress to save drafts, never.

By the way this is a shot from several years ago when I visited the island of Borneo.  It was really a fantastic experience, and I’d really like to go back and dive back into that amazing  jungle, however much I hate leeches!  Have a great week everyone.

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Wordless Wednesday: Fishing in the Fog   8 comments

Lost_Lake_9-19-13_5D3_036

Posted September 25, 2013 by MJF Images in Nature Photography, People, Photography

Tagged with , , , , , , ,

Single-Image Sunday: A Cool Embrace   9 comments

In the Pacific Northwest one heads to the coast in order to warm up in winter or cool down in summer.  With the Japanese Current bringing cold water from the Gulf of Alaska, this coast is often foggy.  The current also causes cold, nutrient-rich waters to well up along the coast, helping to support the region’s rich marine life.  While the cold currents nourish life in the sea, the fog they create nourishes dense forest on land.  The foggy conditions, not surprisingly, have also caused many a shipwreck over the years.  The entire Pacific NW coast is rugged and studded with lighthouses, but the north Olympic Coast in Washington is an especially big graveyard for ships.

I captured this image on my recent trip to the Olympic Peninsula.  The narrow, curvy road out to Cape Flattery runs along a rugged, forested coast facing the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Cape Flattery lies on the Makah (American Indian) Reservation.  It is the northwestern-most point of the United States (excluding Alaska).  Fog came in and out during my one-night stay out there.  I wanted to capture the primal feel of this place where rugged rainforest-clad hills meet the sea.  During summer, this kind of weather is not nearly as common as it is in winter, so I felt pretty lucky in that regard.

The rugged and wet north coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington faces the Strait of Juan de Fuca and is prone to foggy weather.

The rugged and wet north coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington faces the Strait of Juan de Fuca and is prone to foggy weather.

Hope you enjoy the picture.  Please click on it if you’re interested in purchase options.  It is copyrighted and not available for free download, sorry ’bout that.  Please contact me with any questions about this image or anything else you’re curious about.  Thanks for checking in!

Single Image Sunday: Panther Creek Bridge   7 comments

A bridge over Panther Creek in Washington's Gifford Pinchot National Forest almost fades into a misty rainy dusk evening.

A bridge over Panther Creek in Washington’s Gifford Pinchot National Forest almost fades into a misty rainy dusk evening.

I haven’t posted a black and white image in awhile.  This was quite a productive trip last time we had real weather.  Stood right in the middle of the creek for this one.  Click the image to access price information on a variety of print and download options for the high-res. version.  Thanks for taking a look!

Oregon Weather   4 comments

Typical weather in western Oregon's forested Cascade Mountains outside of the height of summer.

Typical weather in western Oregon’s forested Cascade Mountains outside of the height of summer.

 

The weather in the Pacific Northwest (western Oregon and Washington) can be described in one word: drippy.  This is not always true of course.  Summer is typically sunny and beautiful.  But for much of the year, this region of the country gets hit by one storm another other coming off the Pacific Ocean.  The percentage of cloudy days here is by far higher than anywhere else I have lived.  In short, there is a good reason the Northwest is green and heavily forested.

This Spring, the weather has been typically cloudy and wet.  There have been a few warm sunny days of late, and that has given the hopelessly optimistic (naive?) among us the impression that the rainy season is over.  But this past weekend’s cool wet weather shattered that fantasy.  I feel sorry for newcomers to Oregon.  They actually expect springtime to bring warm and sunny weather.  They don’t really get it yet.  Reliably warm and bright weather does not arrive here until after the 4th of July.  Cruelly, it really does seem to like waiting until after this holiday weekend.

Fog and sun battle for dominance in an Oregon forest.

Fog and sun battle for dominance in an Oregon forest.

Being a photographer, I know that bad weather provides some opportunities along with its challenges.  So over the weekend I spent some time trying to get atmospheric pictures of our lush green forests and waterfalls.  (Tune in to the next post for the waterfalls.)  I look on weather like this as an opportunity to capture the unique and special feel of this place, the deep forested canyons and ridges that make up western Oregon’s Cascades and Coast Range.  You really can’t do that when the skies are clear, because the pictures end up looking like so many other beautiful places.

The steep forest of the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon sees plenty of misty-rainy days.

The steep forest of the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon sees plenty of misty-rainy days.

So I went on short hikes into the nearby Columbia River Gorge.  My goal was to be out photographing between showers.  I really don’t enjoy hiking in the rain for one thing.  For another, my camera gear is even more averse to wet weather.  Go figure!  As I should have expected, things did not turn out as I hoped.  Dry periods were spent driving to and from my hiking destinations, while a steady, soaking rain fell for nearly my entire time spent in the woods.  In other words, I spent my weekend getting muddy and soaked from head to toe.

Fog and mist permeates a deep evergreen temperate rain forest in Oregon.

Fog and mist permeates a deep evergreen temperate rain forest in Oregon.

Although it was a struggle to keep my camera gear dry, I managed to get a few good pictures and (amazingly) returned home with a working camera.  I hope you enjoy the pictures.  They are copyrighted and illegal to download without my permission.  Click on any of the images to gain access to the high-res. versions where purchase options are given.  You’ll need to click “add this image to cart” in order to see prices, but they won’t be added to your cart until you decide what you want.  Please contact me with any questions or requests.  Thanks for your interest.

There is a reason Oregon is green and chock-full of streams and rivers.

There is a reason Oregon is green and chock-full of streams and rivers.

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