Archive for the ‘flowing water’ Tag

Single-image Sunday: Reflection of the Sky   15 comments

This recent image from Eagle Creek in the Columbia River Gorge shows the more subtle effects of reflection.

This recent image from Eagle Creek in the Columbia River Gorge shows the more subtle effects of reflection.

 

A quick follow-up to my last post on reflections, this I captured toward the end of day in the inner gorge of Eagle Creek.  I bushwacked into the area and crossed the swift cold stream three times to get to this point.  But then I knew I may as well wait until late-day light, when if I was lucky a sort of golden overtone would pour into the canyon from below.

I got lucky and that happened.  Also the sky above the canyon remained bright and added a highlight – a subtle gold  – on the river in the middle of the picture.  These are all small things, but it’s the small things that add up to a nice image.  Click on the photo to go to the gallery on my website, and please contact me if you have any questions.  Have a great week!

Single-image Sunday: Frozen Portal   11 comments

I titled this shot Frozen Portal because it is the entrance to Oneonta Gorge.  Located in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge, it’s a popular place to photograph anytime and very popular to wade in hot summer weather.  It is a follow-up to Friday Foto Talk – Winter is Unforgiving.  Check that out for a few tips on photographing in wintertime.  This picture is copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission, sorry.  Please contact me if you’re interested, or just click on the image.

The infamous log jam that must be negotiated in order to enter the gorge is visible behind the snow-covered rock at left-center.  I’ve never seen this particular view of Oneonta posted in a picture before, so thought I’d give a different perspective on an oft-photographed place.  I had to stand in thigh-deep freezing water to get this shot, but what is temporary discomfort when you can capture rare frozen Columbia River Gorge scenery like this.  My apologies to any of you in the southern hemisphere who are sweating through the dog days of summer.

Oneonta Creek in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge is gripped by winter.

Oneonta Creek in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge is gripped by winter.

Travel Theme: Flow   6 comments

A small creek in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge rolls through a mossy forest.

A small creek in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge flows in a rolling way through a mossy forest.

I don’t usually go for the theme post, at least those invented by other bloggers.  I figure it’s sorta cheating, letting other people decide what you will blog about because you don’t have any ideas of your own.  Or something like that.

Since I want to avoid being dogmatic about it, occasionally I’ll go along with the crowd, join the party, however you want to phrase it.  But only when the theme intrigues me.  This time it is the concept of flow, Ailsa’s idea on her great blog Where’s My Backpack.  I love flowing water of course, but that’s an easy approach.  Hmm…

If you’re interested in any of these images, just click on them.  You will be taken to the high-res. version where you can view price options by clicking “Purchase Options”.  The images are copyrighted and not available for download without my permission, sorry.  Please contact me if you have any questions.  Thanks for looking!

Spring melting at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah brings a heavy sediment-laden slurry down from the red rocks.

Spring melting at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah brings a heavy sediment-laden slurry flowing down through the snow from the red rocks above.

 

The upper reaches of East Fork Hood River in Oregon tumbles down Mount Hood's slopes.

The East Fork Hood River in Oregon tumbles down through its canyon near Mount Hood Oregon as a spring flows out of its banks to feed it.

 

Sand dunes in Death Valley National Park, California forms textured shadows as the wind blows hard and the sand flows over the surface.

Sand dunes in Death Valley National Park, California forms textured shadows as the wind blows hard and the sand flows over the surface.

 

This flowing rock in southern Utah's Coyote Buttes area was originally formed into enormous dunes, now solidified into rock.

This flowing rock in southern Utah’s Coyote Buttes area was originally formed into enormous dunes, now solidified into rock.

 

 

A close-up view of sandstone strata in the slickrock country of southern Utah, very near the location called "the wave".

A close-up view of sandstone strata in southern Utah, very near the location called “the wave”.  The sandstone appears to flow on different scales, though it is solid rock.  Originally of course, it was formed by flowing currents.

A small stream deep in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge flows through a green-lined channel.

A small stream deep in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge flows through a green-lined channel.

 

One of the easiest ways to get into a "flow", that feeling of timeless, effortless doing, is cross-country skiing.

One of the easiest ways to get into a “flow”, that feeling of timeless, effortless doing, is cross-country skiing.

 

The clouds rapidly flow out of the basin containing Mowich Lake as night comes on and temperatures drop, revealing Mount Rainier standing above.

The clouds rapidly flow out of the basin containing Mowich Lake as night comes on and temperatures drop, revealing Mount Rainier standing above.

 

The Sandy River flows and eddies, throwing golden reflections from the setting sun back up at Steelhead fishermen.

The Sandy River in NW Oregon flows and eddies, throwing golden reflections from the setting sun back up at Steelhead fishermen.

 

The upper Columbia River in Washington flows smoothly but powerfully during spring's high flows.  On the opposite bank lie giant current ripples, formed during an ice age flood bigger than any we know about in earth history.

The upper Columbia River in Washington flows smoothly but powerfully during spring’s high flows. On the opposite bank lie giant current ripples, formed during an ice age flood bigger than any we know about in earth history.

 

 

Standing atop the columns of a basalt flow, cooled and hardened millions of years ago, in Washington's Channeled Scablands.

Standing atop the columns of a basalt flow, cooled and hardened millions of years ago, in Washington’s Channeled Scablands.

 

Golden light from a setting sun is reflected from the churning, flowing surf at Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon Coast.

Golden light from a setting sun is reflected from the churning, flowing surf at Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon Coast.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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