Archive for the ‘blooming’ Tag

Two for Tuesday: Close-up Signs of Spring   12 comments

Orange globe mallow in bloom.

Orange globe mallow in bloom.

Yesterday was the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere.  So in celebration here’s a Two for Tuesday post.  It’s where I post two photos that are related to each other in some way.

This pair shows a couple closely related signs of Spring.   During a splendid hike through a desert canyon recently, the season was springing forth in typical desert fashion.  Spring rarely bowls you over in the desert.  But the closer you look the more you see.  It’s why both of these are close-up shots.

The hummingbird surprised me at first when he buzzed by my head, looking straight at me hovering a couple feet away before zooming off to perch on his branch.  I wondered why he was there at first, but then walkiaround I found a spring with some flowers blooming.  In fact the further up the little draw I walked the more like a lush oasis it seemed.

This little hummer was spending part of his morning checking out the visitor to his little oasis near a spring in a desert canyon: Death Valley National Park.

This little hummer was spending part of his morning checking out the visitor to his little oasis near a spring in a desert canyon: Death Valley National Park.

Get out there and enjoy springtime (or autumn for my southern hemisphere friends).  And thanks for checking in!

Spring in the Pacific Northwest – Part II   5 comments

This is an impressive waterfall in Washington's southern Cascade Range, near Mount St. Helens.  Here you see it in full-on spring flood.

This is an impressive waterfall in Washington’s southern Cascade Range, near Mount St. Helens. Here you see it in full-on spring flood.

One Soggy Rose.

One Soggy Rose.

This is the second of two parts on what regions to visit and when in the Pacific Northwest.  The recommendations are particularly relevant for nature and landscape photographers, but anyone who plans to visit during spring or early summer will find it useful.  Since I’m going to just jump in where I left off, it’s best to check out Part I first.

POPULATED AREAS

Speaking of spring flowers (I was actually speaking of them in the 1st part!), let’s not forget the gardens and cultivated areas through the western valleys and cities of the Pacific Northwest.  The tulips bloom starting in April and there are several farms that welcome visitors.  The area around Woodburn is very popular; so popular with photogs. in fact, that I’ve stubbornly avoided taking one picture there!  I do love tulips, and there are plenty around town to photograph.  The roses for which Portland is famous bloom about the time of the city’s signature event, Rose Festival (go figure!).  This is late May into June.  A visit to Portland’s Rose Garden during a cloudy day right after rainfall can yield amazing flower pictures.

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At Portland's Rose Garden, spring showers linger into the season of bloom.

At Portland’s Rose Garden, spring showers linger into the season of bloom.

For people pictures, head down to the waterfront for the Rose Festival itself, or to one of the street fairs such as Last Thursday (Alberta Street, last Thursday of every month, May – October).  Or just go to one of our “hip” neighborhoods and hang out.  There is always something going on in this town.

The cherry blossoms and unsettled weather go along with Spring in Portland, Oregon.

The cherry blossoms and unsettled weather go along with Spring in Portland, Oregon.

Portland's Rose Festival is a great place to stroll around, enjoying the perfect weather and comfort food.

Portland’s Rose Festival is a great place to stroll around, enjoying the perfect weather and comfort food.

The street fair in Portland known as Last Thursday attracts thousands of artists, musicians and spectators.

The street fair in Portland known as Last Thursday attracts thousands of artists, musicians and spectators.

THE COAST

At some point in springtime, hopefully during the kind of off and on weather that the season is known for around here, you’ll want to visit the coast.  The greening up does not skip this part of Oregon, and spring storms can bring great wave action as well.  Extra-low tides are great for exploring (and photographing) the fascinating sea life in tidal pools.  The Oregon Coast is simply one of those places you should try your level best to see at some point.

Big waves pound the tilted layers of an ancient delta at Cape Arago on the central Oregon Coast.

Big waves pound the tilted layers of an ancient delta at Cape Arago on the central Oregon Coast.

And while you’re at it do the northern California coast and/or the Olympic Coast in Washington.  These are just as beautiful as Oregon, since it’s really just a continuation.  Have to admit I’m partial to our coast though.  For one thing, you’ll see no private property signs or fences blocking access to a beach in Oregon.  That would be against the law, since every bit of coast up to high-tide line is public property.  For another, the whole coast is beautiful, from one end to the other.  It’s one long continuous stretch of pretty little towns, capes and sea stacks.  The Olympic Coast is wilder though, being in a National Park.

The sun goes down as wading birds forage for tiny crustaceans along the northern California coast where a creek enters the ocean.

The sun goes down as wading birds forage for tiny crustaceans along the northern California coast where a creek enters the ocean.

Spring used to not be my favorite season around these parts.  I still don’t really like how long it can be. Enough already!  But with the flowers and generally good weather conditions for photography, with the lush green forest and filled-to-the-brim waterfalls, with all the days conducive to rainbows, I’ve come around to liking this season..a lot.  There must be some reason I tend to stick around the Northwest during this time of year.

A small barn in rural western Oregon, at day's end on a typical spring showery day.

A small barn in rural western Oregon, at day’s end on a typical spring showery day.

A perfectly symmetrical daisy blooms in Portland, Oregon.

A perfectly symmetrical daisy blooms in Portland, Oregon.

Of course we have beautiful (but much shorter) autumns.  And summer is filled with near-perfect days and breezy nights (generally too clear for a photographer’s liking though).  Come November now, I’ll be itching to get out of Dodge.  But spring and early summer are really when the Pacific Northwest shines.  The only problem?  There is much too much to do, and with the year’s longest days to do it in.  Spring is also the time to kayak and raft the whitewater on the smaller, undammed rivers.  It’s the time to climb (and ski down) the snow-clad volcanoes.  It’s time to join in the fun of outdoor festivals and outings.  It’s a time when you wonder if sleep really is overrated.

Thanks for looking!

A spring storm clears at Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon coast just in time for sunset.

A spring storm clears at Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon coast just in time for sunset.

Single-Image Sunday: the Mariposa Lily   Leave a comment

I’m going to start trying to use each Sunday to post single images, in posts that are word-scarce, especially compared with Friday’s photo how-to posts.

A beautiful flower of springtime in the drier semi-desert areas of eastern Washington, Oregon and adjacent Idaho is the Mariposa lily.

A beautiful flower of springtime in the drier semi-desert areas of eastern Washington, Oregon and adjacent Idaho is the Mariposa lily.

The beautiful mariposa lily is my favorite wildflower from the steppe regions of the Pacific Northwest where I live.  It blooms in late springtime, usually in single, tall flowers.  They look so delicate and easy for the wind to flatten (and the wind does blow strong in these parts).  But they are as dependable in eastern Oregon and Washington after spring rains as the smell of sagebrush.  Enjoy!

Note that this image is copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission, sorry.  Just click on it if you’re interested in it.  Once you are in the high-res. version, click “add this image to cart”.  It won’t be added to your cart right away.  Click the appropriate tab to be shown pricing options.  Please contact me if you have any questions, and thanks very much for your interest.

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