Archive for the ‘birds’ Tag

Single-Image Sunday: Evening at the Wetlands   4 comments

I’ve not been shooting much at all over the past year, which makes me sad.  But I’ve bought some new gear together lately and am trying to get out and use it as much as I have time for.  The other day I decided to try my luck at a local wetland.  The bird population definitely picks up there during the winter months.

Instead of using my long lens to zoom in for standard close-ups, I decided to try for wider angles of birds and/or gators in their environment.  This is one of the images, a blue heron perched at nest against the dusk sky.  I got some other birds in silhouette plus a gator, and I’ll post that soon.  I used my new camera, a Canon 7D Mk II, which I got for wildlife.  Since it’s a crop-frame, getting the good depth of field this image needed was a little challenging.  It was a very peaceful evening out there.

Viera Wetlands, Florida

 

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Wordless Wednesday: The Birds   2 comments

Wordless Wednesday: Happy Winter Solstice!   8 comments

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Wordless Wednesday: Mtn. Bluebird Brings Home the Bacon   7 comments

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Wordless Wednesday: American Dipper in Her Neighborhood   16 comments

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Two for Tuesday: Close-up Signs of Spring   12 comments

Orange globe mallow in bloom.

Orange globe mallow in bloom.

Yesterday was the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere.  So in celebration here’s a Two for Tuesday post.  It’s where I post two photos that are related to each other in some way.

This pair shows a couple closely related signs of Spring.   During a splendid hike through a desert canyon recently, the season was springing forth in typical desert fashion.  Spring rarely bowls you over in the desert.  But the closer you look the more you see.  It’s why both of these are close-up shots.

The hummingbird surprised me at first when he buzzed by my head, looking straight at me hovering a couple feet away before zooming off to perch on his branch.  I wondered why he was there at first, but then walkiaround I found a spring with some flowers blooming.  In fact the further up the little draw I walked the more like a lush oasis it seemed.

This little hummer was spending part of his morning checking out the visitor to his little oasis near a spring in a desert canyon: Death Valley National Park.

This little hummer was spending part of his morning checking out the visitor to his little oasis near a spring in a desert canyon: Death Valley National Park.

Get out there and enjoy springtime (or autumn for my southern hemisphere friends).  And thanks for checking in!

Wordless Wednesday: Sunset Paddle   Leave a comment

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Wordless Wednesday: In Florida!   8 comments

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Single Image Sunday: A New Friend?   5 comments

This is the second time I’ve risked my skin climbing up Rooster Rock to get eye level with my new friend, the osprey.  The nest is at the top of a big fir tree that has had its crown lopped off by lightning.  The view over the river for sunset was my original motivation, but I think now it’s really about the fish hawk.

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She was not happy the first time I did it, and this time she was only slightly less noisy.  I can see progress though.  Sorta have to cling to a perch while taking the picture, so I’m glad the Mister was far too busy fishing to pay me much mind.  He did do a flyover however, to see what she was squawking about I suppose.

I’m definitely thinking of returning at least a couple more times.  I want to see the chicks when they hatch.  Of course her gradually increasing comfort with me might vanish when the little ones appear.  We’ll see.

Bird Photography Follow-Up: Birds of Tikal   Leave a comment

A large male great curassow (Crax rubra) prowls the jungle floor at the Mayan ruins of Tikal in Guatemala.

A quick follow-up to my previous post on bird watching.  I never posted the picture of a great currasow I got in Guatemala, at Tikal.  That error is rectified above.  Tikal is one of the largest Mayan City you can visit, and certainly one of the most spectacular.  It lies in northern Guatemala, and is very easy to access from Belize.  The Peten is an amazing swath of jungle that lies along the southern Yucatan – Guatemala border.  It is incredibly rich in wildlife, and also has many Mayan ruins.  It is definitely the richest hunting ground for archaeologists searching for undiscovered Mayan cities.  Because of its remoteness, it is also a favorite among drug smugglers, who cross into Mexico here on their way to the U.S.

A misty view of some of the major temples at Tikal, the huge ancient Mayan city in Guatemala.

A scarlet macaw likes Mayan ruins.

The dramatic Temple 5 in the Mayan city of Tikal rises steeply out of the jungle.

I visited the Peten, including Tikal, in 2010.  I went to Calakmul, a remote Mayan site in far south Yucatan, and we were alone at thoseruins, with their enormous pyramids standing far above the jungle.  I also visited Palenque in Chiapas, where I most certainly was not alone.  Later in the trip, I crossed from western Belize into Guatemala & headed to Tikal.  When I arrived at the nearest town, Peten Itza, I decided to go right up to the ruins.  It’s very easy to catch a van or taxi to Tikal.  Most of the hotels are in Flores, but I think that’s too far from the ruins.  Clouds and rain showers were hanging about, but this turned out to be a blessing.  Not only were the crowds nonexistent, but the atmosphere added much to my photos from that day.

The first thing you notice about Tikal is its size.  You can walk from temple to temple, but unlike most Mayan sites, these walks are actually superb nature walks.  The jungle that separates the major temple complexes is rich in birds, monkeys and even jaguar.  I saw many beautiful birds, a crocodile, and a spider monkey.  As anyone who has been to Tikal knows, the constant calls of oropendula accompany your tour.  What a beautiful forest.  The next day I had much more time to tour the ruins, but it was a beautiful day, so the photos were not as good.  Still, I saw many birds and another monkey.

Tikal is hands-down my favorite Mayan ruin, and I’ve been to all the major ones.  It combines spectacular temples and massive scale with relative remoteness and beautiful surroundings.  It does receive many visitors, but its size means you can get away from the crowds easily.  Still, I would try to go either early in the morning or late, especially if the weather is unsettled.  You will see more wildlife this way, plus your pictures will likely be better than with the bright sunshine (which tends to wash out the subtle colors).

Go see Tikal, and don’t forget your binoculars!

A basilisk lizard hunts his territory in the jungles of Tikal, Guatemala.

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