Archive for the ‘American West’ Tag

Rural America: Summary Musings   15 comments

Rural ranchland of southwestern Colorado.

We’ve been rambling through the rural western U.S. on a series of road-trips.  Now it’s time to pause for a bit of reflection.  I’m greatly enjoying this series and hope you are too.  It’s been great to get away from photography topics for awhile and celebrate the reason I do it in the first place.  I first got into photography on my first ever solo road-trip at the tender age of 18.

A couple months after graduating high school I escaped my east-coast birthplace and drove across country in my Pontiac.  I’d been given a little manual camera as a gift.  Knowing nothing of the rule of thirds or anything else about photography, I shot many rolls of Kodachrome on that trip.  To this day documenting subjects I find while traveling is my #1 reason for doing photography.  I’m more serious about it now, with the added motivation of artful expression thrown into the mix.  But it’s still all about exploration and inspiration.

An old wood Baptist church sits in the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

America celebrates horses (and doesn’t eat them): wild foal and mare, North Dakota.

The trips I’ve featured in this series have balanced visits to natural wonders with route variations that take in remnants of rural America and its history.  What is so fascinating about many parts of the country is the way that these three (the land, its human history and the way people interact with it now) are interwoven.  It’s possible when traveling in sparsely-populated areas, especially in the West and parts of the Midwest, to feel the power that the landscape exerted on past explorers and settlers, both native and white.  And it’s fascinating to see how the land continues to influence the way modern people live on it.

An old-time antebellum mansion on Georgia’s Atlantic coast.

Tending the land demanded bigger families in America’s past.  These folks lived at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in what was New Mexico Territory.

But everywhere you go in this great country it’s impossible to escape the obvious: things have changed in fundamental ways.  Gone are those days when most people made their living off the land, when they stayed at or very near their birthplaces for their whole lives.  Here’s an important fact about American history: those relative few who did not stay home were critical to shaping the young country.  They were responsible for America spreading westward to the Pacific.  They created the reality of the American spirit and formed the basis for the myths that would later be woven into that reality.

A cemetery out on the windblown plains of western Oklahoma.

Interior of a round barn: southeastern Oregon.

Nowadays nearly everyone moves somewhere else.  The same kinds of motivations are at work for us as for our forebears: a desire to start anew.  But since travel today does not entail near the hardship of days past, many more people move.  A person who is willing to take the chance that moving across country may mean that some of the family will die on the way is quite different than one who drives a U-Haul to California for a new job.  The latter is taking risks, but nothing like the former, whose life could literally collapse around her.

A cabin draws a small herd of free-range horses at the base of remote Steens Mountain, Oregon.

Crystal River runs down one of my favorite little valleys in the Colorado Rockies, home to a lucky few.

In my own travels through the west I’ve often tried to put myself into the boots of those risk-takers.  I imagine riding into rough country without maps, where my destination was more hope than reality, where I was in very real danger of being assaulted by robbers or bands of vengeful braves.  The change that has overtaken the world has not spared the western U.S.  But in out-of-the-way corners it is still possible to see things that have changed little, or even not at all.  And that’s what this series was all about.  (I say ‘was’ but I’ll return to the theme again when the mood strikes.)  Thanks for reading!

Spring daffodils bloom at an old cabin in Cades Cove, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee.

The Great Smoky Mountains in Tennessee live up to their name.

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Rural America ~ Desert SW Roadtrips: San Diego to Santa Fe   7 comments

Technicolor sunrise over the grinding pits (metates) at a native village site in Mine Wash, Anza Borrego, California.

Our photographic journey through rural America continues with the final segment of road-tripping the Desert Southwest.  I’m approaching these trips from a rural perspective because, despite profound change, much remains of the flavour of America in its halcyon days.  All you need to do is get off the beaten track, slow down and explore.

We start this long road-trip along the southern reaches of the Desert Southwest on the Pacific in San Diego.  And I can’t think of a better place to end but in the historic center of the Southwest, Santa Fe.  If you’re flying in and renting a vehicle, you might use LAX instead of San Diego.  And dropping off in Albuquerque rather than Santa Fe may make more sense depending on airfares and vehicle rental.

Mogollon Mountains, New Mexico.

San Diego to Tucson

Despite my aversion to using interstate freeways, save some time and start out by traveling east on I-8.  Give at least a little time to Anza Borrego, southern California’s premier desert state park.  Great little canyon hikes are found just off the freeway.  Or for more depth detour north into the park’s heart by turning left onto Hwy. 79 to the charming town of Julian.  Then drive east on Hwy. 78 into the Mojave Desert.  If you come this way an interesting spot to check out is Mine Wash, site of a former native village (see image at top).

Keep going east to El Centro, heart of the Imperial Valley.  This is where, courtesy of massive diversion of the Colorado River, America grows winter vegetables.  The agricultural area draws great numbers of day-workers from Mexico.  I’ve spent some time in this area working.  At the Mexicali border crossing I’ve stood in line with hundreds of Mexicans at 4 a.m.  (Don’t ask me why I was crossing back over the border at that hour!)  They were patiently waiting to cross to work the fields until sunset, then queuing up again to cross back into Mexico after dark.  I honestly don’t know how they can do this day after long, hot day.

Teddy bear cholla cactus blooms during summer monsoon rains in Arizona’s Sonoran Desert.

Pass through the town of Yuma, where the temperature is routinely well above 100 deg. F in the summer.  Keep going east on the freeway into Arizona, then turn south at Gila Bend on Hwy. 85 toward Ajo.  This little town has some character, but is dominated to some degree by the presence of a nearby border control base.  The money that the U.S. has thrown into border control since 9/11 can be easily appreciated in this unpopulated desert region.  You’ll see plenty of their SUVs around, but don’t worry.  They are very good at distinguishing tourists from vehicles that warrant their suspicion, and will generally leave you alone.  Still, be ready to stop at checkpoints if you’re anywhere near the border.

The town of Ajo, Arizona has the feel of a small town in Mexico.

After a little walk around Ajo, with its Spanish Colonial feel, continue south into Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument.  This is a wonderful desert park to explore, and the landscape photography is especially rewarding during the late summer monsoon season.  Sure it is hot this time of year, but the storms put on quite the light show.  I did a post on this park, so check it out for more detail.

Travel east again through the desert on Hwy. 86, passing beneath the telescopes of Kitt Peak.  This is one of the world’s premier observatories (it hosts the world’s largest solar telescope), and can be visited on tours or enjoyed at night when the public is invited to come at sunset and stay to peer at the stars through telescopes.  Continue east to Tucson, stopping at Saguaro National Park if you’ve never been there.  Also worth visiting is the Arizona Sonoran Desert Museum, just west of town.

A drive through Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona.

Tucson to Silver City

Continuing east of Tucson you’ll have a decision to make.  If you’re in no hurry, and depending on how much time you want to devote to New Mexico, detour south to the interesting copper town of Bisbee, on the way visiting Tombstone, which is touristy but fun.

For superb hikes in mountains where Geronimo and his Apache brothers used to hole up where the U.S. Cavalry couldn’t find them, turn south off I-10 at Willcox and head up into the Chiricahua Mtns. on Bonita Canyon Drive.  For a stroll through pioneer history, stop at the Faraway picnic site and walk the mile or so through the old Faraway Ranch.  Further up this paved road, which ends at the visitor center, Echo Canyon to the Grotto is a short mile walk.

But if you make time for a longer hike, the amazing rock formations of Heart of Rocks Loop, accessible either from the visitor center or Echo Canyon, are where you should spend most of your energy.  It’s a 7+ miles round-trip trek.  Sadly I seem to have lost my photos of Heart of Rocks.  Time to go back!

In southern Arizona’s monsoon season frequent thunderstorms cause the desert valleys to green up.

Drive back down Bonita Canyon and turn south on Hwy. 42, Pinery Canyon Road.  This partly unpaved road takes you up and over the Chiricahuas, dropping east down a lovely canyon (image above) to a place called Paradise.  Along the way a campsite sits in open forest.  Once you leave the mountains you find yourself in a big desert valley.  There is a community near here based around ultralights and experimental aircraft.  It was established by an internet tycoon.  Also popular in this area is amateur astronomy.  The skies are some of the darkest and clearest on the continent, so stay up late and do some stargazing!

Summer monsoons cause wildflowers to bloom in Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains.

The desert garden landscape of the Chiricahua Mtns., AZ

Turn north on Portal Road and reach the freeway, where you’re not far from the New Mexico border.  Once in this unique state, which feels a bit like a developing country (or like its namesake to the south), set your GPS for Silver City.  The town, set at the base of the Mogollon Mountains (Mogoyon), is gateway to the rugged and remote Gila National Forest, the state’s largest.  The Gila includes America’s first wilderness area, of the same name, along with one named for the man who inspired the creation of wilderness areas, Aldo Leopold.

 

Whiskey or beer? New Mexico.

Silver City to Santa Fe

Silver City, New Mexico, a former mining town that now has a modern look, is still small enough to charm.  It’s home to those who’ve chosen to live set away from the rushed and busy world.   The history of this incredibly scenic area is interesting and multilayered.  About 45 miles north of town are the Gila Cliff Dwellings.  On the way make a quick stop at Pinos Altos, a little town whose mining past is not well-concealed beneath its mountain-rural present (image above).

Once you’re finished with the one-way trip to the cliff dwellings, travel west and north from Silver City on Hwy. 182.  Take the short side-trip to Mogollon, where the historic architecture and remnants of the mines are very well preserved and spectacularly situated.  From here you can continue on Hwy. 159 or 182.  Whichever route you take from here to Santa Fe, don’t be in a hurry.   If you take the time to wander, even stop and chat with a local or two, you may discover what makes rural New Mexico so unique.

The old mining boom town of Mogollon, New Mexico.

Gila Wilderness, New Mexico.

Here are a couple ideas for nature stops to anchor your travel from Silver City to Santa Fe.  If the time of year is right (November-January), consider visiting Bosque del Apache.  It’s a bird refuge near Socorro on I-25, host to huge wintering flocks.  Get there early in the pre-dawn hours – bundle up, it can be cold.  While you’ll have plenty of company in the form of bird photographers, the spectacle of tens of thousands of snow geese taking flight will raise your spirit right along with the noisy birds.  The area is also famous for Sandhill Cranes.

Breath the pristine air: El Malpais, New Mexico.

Another potential route north to Santa Fe takes in El Malpais, a geologically fascinating area of lava flows surrounded by sandstone rimrock.  Not many people seem to visit this vast and pristine area.  Acoma Pueblo, a native community dating from 1100, is a worthwhile stop as well, and is not far east of El Malpais; just an hour further east is Albuquerque.  On your way north to Santa Fe from there, make time to stop and contemplate the Rio Grande River, the lifeline of the region’s culture past and present (image below).

The Rio Grande flows through its canyon: central New Mexico.

Thanks so much for reading (I know, a lot of words!).  I so enjoyed taking you along on a few of my favorite roadtrips through the great Desert Southwest.  Happy shooting!

Bidding goodnight to another day: Salton Sea, California.

Mountain Monday: The Mogollons   20 comments

This post is one day late for International Mountain Day.  But right on time for Mountain Monday!  It highlights a relatively remote place in western New Mexico.  I’d been wanting to go to this part of the southern Rockies for a long time, and earlier this year I finally made it.  I drove up a dirt road that ended at a gate marking the boundary of the Gila Wilderness.  The road continued beyond the gate, growing worse and clinging to the side of a mountain.

I parked and began to hike along the rough jeep track, recognizing it as an old mining route.  I followed it toward the head of a canyon.  Poking around I found some weathered shacks, a couple adits and other remnants of the gold & silver boom of the late 1800s.  There is a ghost town not far from here called Mogollon.  On the way back, as the sun sank lower, the air cooled and fog began to form over the mountains to the west.  It made for a mystical scene.  The sunset that followed was nice, but this shot was my favorite because of its mysterious feel.

The Mogollon Mountains of New Mexico's Gila Wilderness march off into the distance.

The Mogollon Mountains of New Mexico’s Gila Wilderness march off into the distance.

Friday Foto Talk: Focus   4 comments

Dawn at the salt flats: Death Valley National Park, California.

I’m feeling a little guilty about skipping a couple weeks of Friday Foto Talk.  My excuse is that I was mostly away from the internet, camping in the desert.  I think I’m about ready to collate all of these into an e-book (or two!).  Looking back I’ve poured a lot of my knowledge and experience into these Friday posts.

Last time we looked into a fairly subtle topic (subjective vs. objective approaches), so this Friday let’s get back to basics.  Achieving good focus, and the larger issue of getting sharp photos, should be one of the first things you get good at, from a technical point of view, when learning photography.  This post will focus on focus!  It won’t go into the other things you need to do to get sharp images, which I’ve discussed in past posts.

A blooming creosote bush at dawn in the sand dunes at Death Valley.

A blooming creosote bush at dawn in the sand dunes at Death Valley.

WHAT IS FOCUS

The best way to understand this is to play with lenses (free of cameras, eyeglasses or binoculars) and a blank wall or white sheet of paper, with a strong directional light source.  You probably did this in high school science class, drawing light ray diagrams like the one below.

Light rays (which can also be understood as waves) travel roughly parallel with each other as they travel from where they were reflected off the subject to your camera lens.  They are bent inwards by the lens, coming together into a focal point.  From the center of your lens to the focal point is the focal length, usually expressed in millimeters.  Just behind the focal point sits your sensor (or film), the focal plane where an image is formed.  By changing that distance between sensor and lens you bring the subject into focus.

A convex lens like that in a camera brings light rays together and an image into focus.

A convex lens like that in a camera brings light rays together and an image into focus.

It’s important to realize that once you have a subject in focus, it is sitting in a “plane of focus” (which corresponds to the focal plane inside the camera).  Things above, below and to the side of your subject that are the same distance from your lens also sit in that plane, and so are in focus as well.  Things that are off the plane of focus, either closer or further from your lens, are technically not in focus.  But hang on!  They only get blurry gradually as the distance from the plane increases.

What this means for a photographer is that, depending on your depth of field, much of the image (even all of it in many cases) can appear to be sharp & in focus.  This is despite only a small part of the image being smack dab on the focal plane.  It’s a case of having a sufficient depth of field.  If you go for shallow depth of field, only what is on or very nearly on the focal plane will be in focus, with the rest of the image being blurry.

I found this bighorn sheep skull far up a canyon in Death Valley. It sits on a blanket of mud and debris brought down in the flash floods that struck during heavy storms last fall.

I found this bighorn sheep skull far up a canyon in Death Valley. It sits on a blanket of mud and debris brought down in the flash floods that struck during heavy storms last fall.

GETTING FOCUSED IMAGES

Now that we’ve done a little optics 101, let’s get into some practical tips on how to achieve good focus.  Most of what follows applies to whatever DSLR you may be using.  It’s even mostly applicable to mirrorless cameras.  But since I use a Canon, there are a few things that you’ll need to translate to your camera’s specific controls.  Which leads to the first point:

  • Know your camera.  You should be able to work the controls that affect focus (and exposure) without looking, and really without thinking.  Most DSLRs allow you to change which buttons control focus and exposure.  The default setup that most people use is where shutter button controls both auto-focus and exposure.  A half-press of the shutter button starts autofocus and also forces the camera to take a meter reading, fixing exposure.  Full press takes the picture.
A purple mimulus (monkeyflower) blooms in one of Death Valley's canyons. Getting at least two of the blooms to line up on the plane of focus was key.

A purple mimulus (monkeyflower) blooms in one of Death Valley’s canyons. Getting at least two of the blooms to line up on the plane of focus was key.

  • Be flexible in how you use auto-focus.  There are several ways to go about shooting with autofocus.  As you get better as a photographer you’ll realize that where you focus is usually not the composition you want to shoot.  There are three basic ways to approach this using the viewfinder (see below for further options using LiveView).
    • You can point the center of the frame at your subject, half-press the shutter button to get focus, then move the camera to the composition you actually want.
    • It can be easier and more accurate to frame the composition you want first, then change the autofocus point to the one that covers your subject.  On Canon DSLRs, there’s a little button on the top-right that you press with your thumb.  Then you work the joystick on the camera back to change the AF point.
    • A third option is to just focus where you want the focal plane to be, for examples 2/3 into the frame for a landscape where you don’t have important elements that are very close to you.  Then switch your lens to manual focus and shoot away, concentrating on composition and exposure without worrying about focus.  This can be a quick and easy way to go if you’re doing several shots of the same general scene.
In this diagram what they are labeling focal plane I call the "plane of focus", to distinguish it from the actual focal plane, which corresponds to the camera sensor. Click image to visit source page.

In this diagram what they are labeling focal plane I call the “plane of focus”, to distinguish it from the actual focal plane, which corresponds to the camera sensor. Click image to visit source page.

  •  Depth of field and focus go hand in hand.  The diagram above shows depth of field in the simplest way.  And it really is simple in concept.  But the devil is in the details as they say.  How adept you are at working depth of field and focus directly affects how many good shots you get, especially in dynamic, rapidly changing circumstances. 
    • Focal length matters.  You probably already know about how aperture affects your depth of field (how much of the field of view is in focus).  What many novices don’t appreciate enough is how big an influence focal length is on depth of field.  The shorter the focal length (wider-angle of view), the more depth of field you have.  As you zoom in to longer focal lengths, you lose depth of field and need to stop down in aperture (higher f/ numbers) to maintain depth of field.  With some very wide-angle lenses, everything will be in focus for any apertures above f/5.6 or f/8.
    • Lens matters.  In a similar way to focal length, each lens has its own focus characteristics.  While it’s often subtle, some lenses tend to give better depth of field than others.  And of course some are sharper than others, but that’s really separate from focus.  Learn how your lenses render subjects in terms of focus and depth of field.
In Death Valley N.P., California, charcoal kilns leftover from the mining era high up in the Panamint Range offer a spectacular view of the snow-covered Sierra Nevada.

In Death Valley N.P., California, charcoal kilns leftover from the mining era high up in the Panamint Range offer a spectacular view of the snow-covered Sierra Nevada.

 

The narrows of Marble Canyon in Death Valley are one heck of a great hike!

The narrows of Marble Canyon in Death Valley, one heck of a fun hike!

  • Lens calibration.  Some lenses arrive to your door with their focus needing to be calibrated with your camera’s auto-focus system.  A lens may actually focus slightly in front or in back of the focal plane, where your camera says it is focused.  Most DSLRs have the ability to calibrate the auto-focus for quite a long list of lenses.  So check out your owner’s manual and Google to see how to check focus for new lenses.   I’ve only had to calibrate a couple of mine.  Most good lenses, especially when they come from the same company that makes your camera, seem to be spot on in focus.  But all it takes is one to mess up a lot of pictures, so it’s a good idea to check each lens.

 

  • Know when to switch to manual focus.  When light is dim, or when contrast is low (such as in foggy conditions), it’s time to think about manual focus.  Sometimes what you’re shooting is dim or low-contrast, making your camera search for autofocus.  Sometimes I point your camera in another direction, at a subject that is about as far away as my intended subject.  Then I turn off autofocus and switch back to shoot my intended composition.  Or if everything is pretty dim and/or low-contrast, I will go to manual focus.  When I’m working close-up, especially with a macro lens, I almost always switch to manual focus, often setting the distance and moving the camera back and forth until I get good focus.
Because of low-contrast, it can be tough to use auto-focus in foggy conditions. Shot this morning.

Because of low-contrast, it can be tough to use auto-focus in foggy conditions.  Shot this morning with manual focus.

  • Manual focus is often better.  For some shooting manual focus is actually easier and more precise, especially with macro as mentioned above but also with landscapes.  Your camera has ways it will tell you when something is in focus.  Let’s say you change the switch on your lens to MF (manual focus).  If you point the center of the frame (or your selected AF point) at your subject and then rotate the focus ring, a green light is visible in the viewfinder to let you know you’ve achieved focus.  Also if you have it enabled, an audible beep sounds as well.  I have a couple lenses that are manual focus only.  For those I use the focus confirmation light nearly all the time, unless I’m using LiveView (see below).  I don’t like beeps so I never have that enabled.

This kind of shot demands focusing very closely and upping depth of field as much as possible by using a small aperture and as short a focal length as possible.

  • Using LiveView to focus.  When you switch to LiveView, where the image is displayed on the LCD screen on the camera back, you can do everything that you normally do, including focus.  The ability to magnify the image makes LiveView a good way to achieve precise focus.  There is a little white square that shows which part of the image you will magnify, and you can move that white square around.  Normally the white square also is where your exposure is read from too.  Once you have your subject magnified, you then turn the focus ring slowly to get perfect focus.  Then you can move it around to check out how much of the rest of the scene is in focus.  By the way, you can also use autofocus with LiveView.  In that case the white square becomes your focal point, and lights up green when focus is achieved.

 

The low light of evening can make auto-focus difficult. Happy-green mesquite border the sand dunes at Death Valley.

The low light of evening can make auto-focus difficult. Happy-green mesquite bordering the sand dunes at Death Valley.

 

  • Use the depth of field (DOF) preview button.  If you’re using LiveView in the manner above, the DOF preview button comes in handy.  It will show you what is in focus in front or behind your focal plane.  Some cameras don’t have one, so for them you’ll need to shoot and review to zero in on your shot.  When you press the DOF preview button your lens stops down to the aperture you have set.  This allows you to see exactly how much of the frame is in focus, and how blurry the rest is.  You don’t have to be in LiveView; the button works through the viewfinder too.  But with LiveView’s magnifying abilities you can see a lot better.  Remember: whether you’re looking through the viewfinder or on LiveView, what you’re seeing is the view at the largest aperture your lens has (f/4 or f/2.8, for example).  It isn’t showing you the scene at the aperture you have set, and what the picture will be captured at.  If you’re at f/11 for example, you’re seeing more blurriness than the picture will have, unless you press the DOF preview button.

Whew!  That’s enough for now.  Practice makes perfect, so play with all the different ways to get your camera to focus where you want.  Use manual focus and LiveView, auto-focus points and the DOF preview button.  Change composition while fixing focus (and exposure) where it needs to be to get the focus and depth of field right for your images.  Have a great weekend and happy shooting!

A storm blows into Death Valley last week. Dramatic Tucki Peak stands eternal guard.

A storm blows into Death Valley last week. Dramatic Tucki Peak stands eternal guard.

 

Rocky Mountain National Park, Part II   10 comments

The Colorado River looking like any old mountain stream near its headwaters where it flows through and defines the west side of Rocky Mountain National Park.

The Colorado River looking like any old mountain stream near its headwaters where it flows through and defines the west side of Rocky Mountain National Park.

This is the second of two posts on Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado.  Make sure and check out the first part, where I cover some logistics, along with things to do on the popular east side of the park.  This post will take you over to the west side on your one-way tour, entering via Estes Park and exiting through Grand Lake.  You could also do it the opposite way of course.

Trail Ridge Road 

Trail Ridge Road is a famous highway that traverses a high ridge over the Continental Divide.  Local American Indian tribe, the Utes & Arapahos, maintained a foot-trail near where the highway now runs.  They accessed hunting grounds on the Great Plains, where those big mammals you now see mostly limited to the high country in the national parks (elk, buffalo, etc.) used to congregate in huge numbers.  In fact, one of the park’s most popular trails is called the Ute Trail.  It doesn’t involve much climbing and yet accesses high country.

A hike in the tundra along Trail Ridge Road reveals some interesting rock formations along the ridge-line.

A hike in the tundra along Trail Ridge Road reveals some interesting rock formations along the ridge-line.

Find the Ute Crossing Trailhead roughly half-way between Rainbow Curve and Forest Canyon interpretive trail on the east side of Trail Ridge Road.  There is not much parking.  You can walk out a couple miles to a large rock and small pass and then retrace your steps.  Or with a car shuttle you can continue steeply down Windy Gulch a few more miles to Beaver Meadows in Moraine Park.

For sunset, you can’t do much better than drive up to the top of  Trail Ridge Road.  This high highway, reaching over 12,000 feet, traverses alpine tundra with fantastic views of Long’s Peak to the east and the Never Summer Mountains to the west.  Get an early jump on sunset so you can enjoy a walk on the tundra.  Well, not on the tundra, on a trail through the tundra.  It’s delicate.

The sun sets behind the Never Summer Mountains as viewed from Trail Ridge in Rocky Mountain National Park.

The sun sets behind the Never Summer Mountains as viewed from Trail Ridge in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Stop just before the summit at the Rock Cut pull-off.  From here a trail takes off north of the road and winds its way up onto the ridge.  Try your best to tear your eyes away from the incredible vistas and pay some attention to the tiny flowers and other tundra vegetation at your feet.  You won’t see tundra like this in many places outside of far northern Alaska.  There is a visitor center just west of the summit where you can learn about this tough community.

A little side-trail leads right up to the ridge-line where interesting mushroom-shaped rocks (hoodoos) will compete for your attention (see image below).  Climb up onto the summit rocks for some great views of Long’s Peak and surrounding mountains.  I found some great light and beautiful far-reaching photos here (image at bottom).

Hiking in Rocky Mtn. National Park.

Hiking in Rocky Mtn. National Park.

A Warning

I rarely do this on my blog but feel I must in this case.  In Part I I mentioned starting early and finishing before late afternoon.  There is a reason I’m stressing that again, and adding an important point.  In summertime the Rockies are prone to very fast-moving and violent thunderstorms that build up in the afternoon.  Lightning is a very real threat, a threat made clear a few days ago when two hikers died from lightning strikes.  Both died while hiking off Trail Ridge Road, one of them a woman hiking with her husband on Ute Trail.  A total of 13 people were taken to the hospital from one of the strikes alone!

Now there is no reason to fear hiking up high in Rocky in the summer.  These events are rare.  But you’d do well to keep a close eye on the weather.  If big billowing clouds start to catch your attention, it’s time to move to lower ground.  Do not get caught out in open terrain where you’re the tallest thing around.  Do not take shelter under a big lone tree.  Get into a low depression or down into thick forest if you can.  Of course you can mitigate the danger by finishing your hike by 3 or 4 p.m.  But situational awareness is always the best tool you have for this (and all) dangers in the outdoors.

Meadows along the upper Colorado River, Rocky Mountain National Park.

Meadows along the upper Colorado River, Rocky Mountain National Park.

The West Side

At first glance it seems as if the west side of the park is not as full of things to do as the east side.  But look a little deeper.  Though the views may not be as frequent, it is a wonderful place to hike, photograph and watch wildlife.  And this is in no small part because of the Colorado River.  The Colorado is one of two great rivers of the American West (the other being the Columbia).  And this is where it starts.  The Colorado’s headwaters are accessible via a trail that takes off from where Trail Ridge Road finally levels out after a long looping descent.

The Colorado River Trail takes you on a nice level foray through lovely meadows bordering the Colorado (see image above & top).  It’s amazing to see the river in this way if you have experienced it like I have, in the desert southwest.  You’re far upstream from the cactus-lined rocky desert canyons here.  And that includes the biggest of them all, the Grand Canyon.  It’s a mountain stream up here, with bighorn sheep descending the steep rocky slopes to sip from its cold waters.  Keep an eye out for moose as well.

Bighorn sheep ewes browse the steep slopes along the Colorado River Trail.  They let me get within 50 feet of them.

Bighorn sheep ewes browse the steep slopes along the Colorado River Trail. They let me get within 50 feet of them.

The trail heads out to Lulu City, an old silver mining town.  Well, not a town now.  There isn’t really anything left outside of some cabin foundations.  But that’s really okay, because the miners sure picked a pretty spot on which to site the town.  Located in a meadowy area along the river, it makes a fantastic place for a picnic.  Lulu City is about 3.5 flat miles in.

If you’re hankering for more of a hike, keep going to the Little Yellowstone Canyon area.  It resembles the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, though like it’s name suggests is quite a bit smaller.  You can keep going to La Poudre Pass about 7.5 total miles in, and thus reach the true top of the Colorado River system.

From small beginnings:  a spring on a forested hillside in the Rocky Mountains will gather to become the river that serves major U.S. agriculture needs, along with water for major cities like Los Angeles and Phoenix.

From small beginnings: a spring on a forested hillside in the Rocky Mountains will gather to become the river that serves major U.S. agriculture needs, along with water for major cities like Los Angeles and Phoenix.

For photo opportunities, wildlife seems particularly abundant in this part of the park.  A walk near sunset along the winding Colorado is bound to result in beautiful shots of the river and mountains.  If you’re lucky a moose or elk will grace your foreground.  There are a number of other hikes in the area.  I hiked to Big Meadows, a fairly easy 3.2 miles round-trip to a big sea of grass.  Wildflowers were in bloom and I saw plenty of wildlife sign, though no animals.  It would be a great early-morning or evening option.

There are several routes up into the Never Summer Mountains that I didn’t check out.  The hike up to Michigan Lakes Basin seems to me a particularly scenic, if steep, hike.  The hike up to Lake Nokoni features a great wildflower show.  The short walk to Adams Falls is a great family option.  All things to do on my second visit!

Big Meadows, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.

Big Meadows, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.

 

Final Thoughts & When To Go

As I already mentioned, a good way to tour Rocky is to do a loop from east to west (or vice versa), camping along the way.  I visited in late June, and a few of the hikes I did (especially the Bear Lake to Fern lake one-way) crossed abundant snowfields.  The flowers were blooming big-time in the meadows below tree-line.  In July the wildflower show moves up to the subalpine areas as the snow melts, so right now is a perfect time for a visit.  And so is autumn, with the Rocky Mountains’ signature quaking aspen adding their spectacular golden colors to the mix.

The Colorado River not far north of Grand Lake meanders across a verdant valley beneath beautiful mountains.

The Colorado River not far north of Grand Lake meanders across a verdant valley beneath beautiful mountains.

It’s worth repeating that this is quite the popular park.  You should avoid it during summer weekends or holidays.  If you come in May or early June (depending on how much snow fell during winter), be prepared for snow blocking access to many trails and even roads.  If you look at a map of the park you’ll notice that it covers a big area with limited road access.

What this means is that it will at first seem crowded (as it did to me).  But as soon as you put a couple miles or more between you and a road you’ll find big empty mountainous country.  Just make sure to take it easy and go at a measured pace.  The high altitudes will humble even the most fit flatlander.  Thanks for reading!  I hope your summer is filled with fun and sun!

 

Long's Peak, the highest mountain in Colorado, catches the evening's last sunlight from high up on Trail Ridge.

Long’s Peak, the highest mountain in Colorado, catches the evening’s last sunlight from high up on Trail Ridge.

Single-image Sunday: Iconic American West   5 comments

This is a shot I captured near sunset in Indian Canyon, a large drainage that has been grazed by cattle (and sheep) for generations.  While still used, it is near Canyonlands National Park and a large part is covered by the Indian Creek Recreation Area.  Though there remain grazing allotments, there are nowhere near as many stock on these lands as in its heyday in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

The rock monolith, called North Six-Shooter Peak, a type seen in so many western movies, was too tempting for me.  I had to run to catch the sun before it sank into the clouds behind the peak.  Along with the falling-down barbed wire fence and scattered sad-looking bunchgrass, it makes for a picture that to me represents the country more than most of my more beautiful pictures. Let me know if you agree or disagree.  I love all comments and feedback!  I hope your weekend is going well.

North Six-Shooter Peak near Canyonlands National Park, Utah.

North Six-Shooter Peak near Canyonlands National Park, Utah.

Mountain Monday: The San Juan Mtns., Colorado   8 comments

Since I missed Single-image Sunday again I will post a single shot from yesterday evening.  The sunset promised to be a pretty one, and I was racing to catch it from Dallas Divide, where Hwy. 62 in SW Colorado offers a grand view of the San Juan Mountains.  But on the way to this place from which I’ve been skunked repeatedly by weather socking in, I spied a dirt road to the left.

I took the road, went through a cattle gate, and it wasn’t long before things got too rough for my (2WD) vehicle.  The view was of a different part of the San Juans here, an eastern arm that is lower in elevation but with a lot of cliffs and knife-edge ridges.

I had no time to spare as I hiked as fast as I could up a nearby ridge to get a decent view of it.  The high altitude here always hits me hard whenever I exert myself, and so I had to stop a couple times to catch my breath.  Though I caught the direct orange light on the range (barely), it is this purplish light just after sunset that I think I like best.  The colors are more subtle but I like the way they match the overall atmosphere of the place: high and pristine.  The air was crisp and clean as it should be in late autumn in the Rockies.  And the view so grand and beautiful!

If you are interested in this image just click on it for purchase options.  It’s copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission, sorry.  If you have any questions or a special request for this or any other image, just contact me.  Thanks for checking it out, and have a great week everyone!

An eastern arm of Colorado's spectacular San Juan Mountains.

An eastern arm of Colorado’s spectacular San Juan Mountains.

A Visit to Photograph Santa Fe & Taos, New Mexico   8 comments

Adobe rules in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Adobe rules in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

I had never been to this part of the country and I wanted to see why it was so popular as a travel destination.  Great Sand Dunes National Park was still closed because of the Govt. shutdown, and thinking it might open very soon (which happened) I made the detour down from south-central Colorado last week.

I drove down to the little town of Questa in spitting snow.  Camping above the Rio Grande River, I woke next morning to find about 4 inches of snow had fallen.  The weather gradually cleared and warmed a bit over the next few days.  I made my way first to Taos and then to New Mexico’s capital Santa Fe.  Both are chock-full of adobe architecture, some of it very old and restored.  This post will give tips for visiting the region and touch on its history.  Images of the architecture will take center stage.

The Rio Grande Gorge near Questa, New Mexico on a snowy morning.

The Rio Grande Gorge near Questa, New Mexico on a snowy morning.

Both Santa Fe and Taos are great for strolling and exploring.  Santa Fe is the more touristy of the two and is larger.  But you’ll find no tall buildings in Santa Fe, and really not much traffic.  Both are small enough to walk but Taos is very much a town compared to Santa Fe, which is a small city.

Cathedral Basilica of St Francis of Assisi in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Cathedral Basilica of St Francis of Assisi in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Santa Fe

I started in Santa Fe, America’s oldest state capital (and highest at 7000 feet).  It was founded by the Spanish in 1607 and played a big role in the early western expansion of the U.S.  Many famous people have spent time here, both in historic and more recent times.  The artist Georgia O’Keefe lived and painted here in the early 20th century.  It also has a world-renowned opera.

There is paid parking throughout the downtown area, in old-fashioned coin meters.  If you’re willing to walk into the center, you can find free parking.  I visited the friendly Capital Coffee, which is only 5 minutes walk from the edge of the historic center.  After coffee, I used their parking lot to strike off into the streets and shoot.  I was only a little over an hour doing this.  I would not take advantage and spend half the day parked there.

Adobe houses are, above all, simple.  You can see the straw used to mix the adobe.

Adobe houses are, above all, simple. You can see the straw used in the adobe.

I recommend simply wandering through the streets around the central plaza.  The plaza (zocalo in Mexico) is a good landmark to keep circling back to.  There are innumerable art galleries to visit of course.  The town is a magnet for artists of all stripes.  I focused on shooting exteriors here.  I photographed mostly when the sun was low but not so low that shadows dominated.

Built in 1607, this is America's "oldest" house, though since it is adobe, it's been continuously patched and rebuilt over the years.

Built in 1607, this is America’s “oldest” house, though since it is adobe, it’s been continuously patched and rebuilt over the years.

Rather than list places to visit, I urge you to check out Wiki’s travel guide (which includes a walking map) or do your own Googling.  For the rich history of this 400+-year old city, you couldn’t do much better than start with the Palace of the Governors.  This is the former center of Spain’s colonial government here and is now New Mexico’s state history museum.

While you’re strolling, it’s very worthwhile trying to get access to the placitas (commonly called courtyards in most areas).  Placitas characterize the architecture here. Found throughout Latin America as well, here these delightful open-air spaces are surrounded by low-slung adobe buildings.  During my travels in Mexico, Central and South America, courtyards have been a favorite place to chill out and soak in the sun: reading, journaling and relaxing.

Inside a traditional placita.

Inside a traditional placita, this one at the Blumenshein Home in Taos.

Traditionally several families would live in the homes bordering the placita, sharing it as an outdoor living and animal husbandry area.  Some flowers and other plants were grown but placitas were not traditionally devoted to gardens as they mostly seem to be these days.  Modern placitas (courtyards) also differ in being most often surrounded by one single-family dwelling.

I found Taos to be much easier than Santa Fe in terms of wandering in and out of placitas, but you might have better luck than I did in Santa Fe.

The Scottish Rite Cathedral is located a mile or so from the center of Santa Fe but is a magnificent building worth photographing.

The Scottish Rite Cathedral is located a mile or so from the center of Santa Fe but is a magnificent building worth photographing.

The moon rises over the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Santa Fe.

The moon rises over the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Santa Fe.

I like Taos a little better than Santa Fe.  Santa Fe seems a bit strange to me.  Maybe it’s because of all the tourism clashing with history clashing with the modern influx of wealthy retirees clashing with the older residents of the area (many Native American) clashing with the new-age types.  It seems to me to be a place lacking an identity. Also, real estate prices are way out of whack.

So much of the adobe in Santa Fe looks like it was built yesterday, which I think takes away from the real history of the place.  Taos suffers some of the same, but I’ve found this effect to run rampant throughout the world, anywhere history and authenticity gets in the way of modern life and “progress”.  At least they keep to adobe construction and style here.

A house in Taos.

A house in Taos.

Taos

Taos has some of the same vibe as Santa Fe but it’s much smaller and has a definite character.  Besides being a gateway to mountain recreation (including great skiing), Taos is a fine place to wander around and photograph.  Kit Carson, the famous scout and mountain man lived here.  Or I should say his hispanic wife and their kids lived here while he passed through from time to time.

One of the few windows in Kit Carson's old home.

One of the few windows in Kit Carson’s old home.

The restored placita next to the Kit Carson Home in Taos, New Mexico.

The restored placita next to the Kit Carson Home in Taos, New Mexico.

There is a main plaza in Taos as well.  In Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America these zocalos or plazas seem to be much more “alive” with activity than in Taos and Santa Fe.  I think it’s because of all the limitations in the U.S. for people to just set up carts with cheap eats.  Here they serve as centers for shopping, much of it high end.  In Mexico they’re places for street performers, strolling couples and great street food.  The ones in New Mexico look just like zocalos but are not the same at all.

A church-bell in Taos.

A church-bell in Taos.

You can park very near the plaza at one of the public parking lots (feed coins into the meters) or look for free spots 10 minutes walk to the plaza.  You can just wander through the streets surrounding the plaza.  The placita bordered by Kit Carson’s house is interesting, restored to near what it would have looked like.  The placita at the Blumenshein Home is a great one too, and the narrow street it’s on, Ledoux, is lined with attractive adobe architecture.

A great mural at the entrance to Ledoux Street in Taos, New Mexico.

A great mural at the entrance to Ledoux Street in Taos, New Mexico.

A couple places I neglected on this trip but which are certainly worth checking out are Taos Peublo just north of town and Ranchos de Taos a couple miles south of town.  Taos Pueblo has some of the oldest buildings in the area.  At Ranchos de Taos, the deservedly famous San Francisco de Assisi Mission Church is an amazing building.  I suppose I need to skip some things to have an excuse to return!

A bit of fall color in Taos, New Mexico.

A bit of fall color in Taos, New Mexico.

This high and beautiful area of New Mexico is certainly worth visiting.  The climate is darn near perfect and the Sangre de Cristos Mountains are gorgeous.  Also, the Rio Grande River flows through it.  It’s a very beautiful stream that runs in and out of rugged canyons.  One morning I took a frosty walk along the river and found some fall colors (image below).

As usual, clicking on any of the images takes you to my gallery page, and all the pictures are copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission. Please contact me if you are interested in any of them; they’ll be uploaded to my site soon.  Thanks for reading and have a superb week!

The Rio Grande River and colorful cottonwoods between Santa Fe & Taos, New Mexico.

The Rio Grande River and colorful cottonwoods between Santa Fe & Taos, New Mexico.

Friday Foto Talk: The Wide-angle Lens, Part II   9 comments

A wide angle allows you to get close and low to interesting foregrounds, like these dunes near Sossusvlei, Namibia.  24 mm., 1/4 sec. @ f/22.

A wide angle allows you to get close and low to interesting foregrounds, like these dunes near Sossusvlei, Namibia. 24 mm., 1/4 sec. @ f/22.

This is the second of two parts on using the wide-angle lens in landscape photography.  The first part dealt with basic concepts like what makes a wide-angle lens, full-frame vs. crop-frame, etc.  Now let’s dive into actually using these lenses to create good images.

Here are a few things the wide-angle lens allows you to do:

      • Create a sense of space.  This might seem obvious, but these lenses’ wide fields of view can really help to create the mood of freedom that wide-open spaces can give.  Some viewers will be turned off or even frightened by wide-open spaces, but most will have a positive response. Images like the above tend to give the viewer a sense of the wild, lonely spaces of desert, mountain, ocean and more.
      • Help to add a sense of depth to your image.  Pictures are two-dimensional.  Particularly with landscapes, if you give the viewer some sense of three-dimensionality, or depth, you can put them into the scene.  Note that simply using a wide-angle lens will not add depth; it takes more than that.  A while back, I did a post, Depth, where I described some of the other things you can do to add depth.
A new image from SW Colorado.

A brand new image from SW Colorado.

      • Allow you to maximize depth of field, where more of the image is in focus.  This will help you to tell a story with your image.  In the picture at top, I wanted to highlight the side-lit sand ripples in the beautiful reddish dunes of the Namib desert.  They form strong leading lines that help give the image impact and move the viewer into the image.  Since the wider the angle the more depth of field, a wide angle (plus small aperture) will help you bring all the main elements into focus, from front to back.
      • Include surrounding elements that support your main subject.  Though this one comes in handy not as much with landscapes as with environmental portraits, where the frame includes not only the person or animal but surroundings that tell important things about it.  But if you’re shooting landscapes with strong subjects, there is nothing preventing you from moving in close to that subject and shooting it as you would an environmental portrait.
      • Give a sense of scale.  Though you can certainly use other focal lengths to give a powerful sense of the different sizes of elements in your frame, the wide-angle lens makes it all the easier.
A new image from SE Utah.

A new image from SE Utah, 16 mm. focal length

A pause while hiking at Coldwater Lake, Mount St. Helens, WA.  Shooting this at 24 mm. helps give a sense of scale between my uncle and the enormous tree blown down by the eruption of 1980.

Hiking at Coldwater Lake, Mount St. Helens, WA. Shooting this at 24 mm. & adding my uncle helps provide a sense of the scale of this enormous tree blown down by the eruption of 1980.

There are also a couple potential pitfalls to using a wide-angle lens:

  • Distortion, while present in all lenses, is greatest in wide-angle lenses.  I won’t go into the different types of distortion here.  Suffice to say you’ll notice it when using a wide-angle.  Of course, you may be going for a distorted look, at least to a moderate extent, but for most images it needs to be minimized.  Distortion is fixable to a large extent on the computer afterwards, but it makes sense to be aware of it while shooting.  Here are a couple tips to avoid problems related to distortion:
    • Leave some space around the edges of your composition, especially when you’re going very wide (14-20 mm.) and when tilting the camera significantly.  This will help during post-processing, when some cropping will take place during correction of distortion.  You don’t want to cut off anything important.
    • Avoid putting people or other important subjects along the edges, and especially in the corners, of a wide-angle frame.  This is where distortion is greatest, and you don’t want people to see a picture of themselves stretched in strange ways, believe me.
  • Wide-angles tend to make things appear small.  This is probably the number one complaint that photographers have about wide angle lenses.  While it is certainly true that the shorter focal lengths of wide-angle lenses come with smaller magnifications, once you learn to tap into their strengths, you’ll find this is not really a shortcoming at all. It’s all in the way you use the lens.  Here are a couple examples to give you an idea how I use my wide-angle lenses to help me get past this “limitation” and unleash their potential to add impact to my images.
    • Getting Close to Big Subjects:  If you want to capture a wide part of your subject, whether that’s a swath of terrain, a tree or something else, you need to either pick a very large subject or get close to it, or both.  These two factors are always going to matter when using the wide-angle lens.  You don’t have much control over the size of your subject (other than picking a different one!), but you do have control over how close you get.

The cardon cactus (Baja’s largest) in the image below is quite large.  When I shot it from 10 or 15 feet away, I wasn’t too happy.  By switching to a wider angle and getting very close I prevented the wide-angle from making it look smaller than it is (1st image below).  Then by getting so close I was basically inside it (ouch!) and shooting up at an even steeper angle, I finally got an image that tells the story of this species’ towering, “reaching for the sky” nature (2nd image below).  Both of these were shot at 24 mm.

Cardon cactus on Mexico's Baja Peninsula grow very large.

Cardon cactus on Mexico’s Baja Peninsula grow very large.

A big cardon cactus soars into the desert skies of the Baja Peninsula, Mexico.

A big cardon cactus soars into the desert skies of the Baja Peninsula, Mexico.

This portrait of an ancient pinyon pine in Black Canyon of the Gunnison N.P., Colorado was shot at 24 mm. to let me get close into the shade of the tree and yet show most of its form.

This ancient pinyon pine has been growing with others of its kind on the rim of Colorado’s Black Canyon of the Gunnison for some 750 years.

The pinyon pine in the above environmental portrait is a fascinating but not especially huge tree (at least to an Oregon boy!).  Moving close to it with a wide-angle lens allowed me to fill the frame, emphasizing its form along with the color & texture of its bark.  I wanted just enough background to show its surroundings while not making the tree look too small.  A bonus of moving close was being able to get into the tree’s shade.  During mid-morning’s intense sunshine, this kept exposure from becoming too much of a problem.

New image, Utah Canyonlands.  Shot at 23 mm.

New image, Utah Canyonlands. Shot at 23 mm.

    • Include Foreground, and Get Close!  This is probably the most popular way to use wide-angle lenses in landscape photography.  Getting close is usually a key strategy.  Many times photographers will pick very interesting foregrounds, such as beautiful flower-fields, but then not get close enough.  Foregrounds tend to get lost in many images.

Try this:  Play around with your position.  Find a great background, a mountain- or city-scape for example.  Then look for some interesting foreground element, let’s say it’s flowers in bloom.  Shoot at a single, wide focal length throughout, say 21 mm., and a small aperture (f/22).  You’ll probably need a tripod as well.  Start from 10-20 feet away at eye-level.  Then try a lower position, say belt-level.  Then get closer to it, say 5 feet.  Shoot from eye level, chest-level, belt & knee level.  Get as low as you can without blocking the main subject in the background.  The angle that you tilt your camera downward will necessarily change as your camera position changes.

You’ll find that changing the camera’s position plus its tilt changes the relative impact of foreground and background.  If you are a few inches from ground-level with your camera pointed upward, the background subject(s) will be smaller and sky might dominate the image.  If you’re position is higher and camera pointed down or level, the background subject(s) will look bigger.  Though I asked you to stick with one focal length for the exercise, in reality you may find yourself going to a wider focal length as you get very close to your foreground.  Just realize that going wider also makes the background subject appear smaller.

You need to decide which position yields a picture that matches what you want to show about the scene.  Do you want the foreground to be emphasized or the mountains?  Do you want balance between the two?  You’ll see that the nature and size of your background and foreground, plus your camera position, strongly influence the relative size of those things in your pictures.

Mount Rainier soars above Eunice Lake in Washington.  Shot at 27 mm. and positioned to give the foreground flowers just enough oomph to support but not overwhelm the mountain.

Mount Rainier soars above Eunice Lake in Washington. Shot at 27 mm. and positioned to give the foreground flowers just enough oomph to support but not overwhelm the mountain.

In the image of Mt. Rainier above, I moved closer and lower to the flowers until they had some impact but didn’t quite out-compete Mt. Rainier for attention. Though it might not look like I was that close to the flowers, I was really only five feet or so from them.  This is the great thing about grand background subjects. Their size means that in order to balance them with foreground, you need to move real close to that foreground.  This is good because it adds depth and impact to your image, without taking away from the main subject.

Realize that you and you alone are in control of the overall feel and story in your image.  You can pick your background, foreground, and (crucially) a suitable camera position that will emphasize different parts of the frame. These choices will in turn help to give an overall feel or mood to your image.  They will help you tell the story you want to tell.

Dusk comes to a dry valley in eastern Oregon's "outback".

Dusk comes to a dry valley in eastern Oregon’s “outback”.  A recent image shot at 16 mm.

In the image above, I got very close to the foreground textures of the salty pan.  I shot very wide at 16 mm. to emphasize the big landscape and skies, but stayed up at about belt level with the camera pointed slightly down.  This was so that the Trout Creek Mtns. would not appear too short and so the foreground would take up roughly 2/3 of the image.  I tried a lower position with more sky but ultimately decided that the sky would take care of itself without taking up most of the image (and making the mountains too small).

Hope you got something out of this.  If you’re one of those who has become frustrated using a wide-angle lens, just keep at it.  Play with angles and GET CLOSER!  You’ll soon discover the true potential of the wide-angle.

If you’re interested in purchase options for any of these images, just click on them to be taken to the main part of my website.  They are protected by U.S. copyright and not available for free download, sorry.  Please contact me if you have any questions or want to order a print (framed or unframed) directly from me.  I can also do signed limited edition prints.  Take a look at the selection of limited edition prints on my site.

Thanks for your interest.  Have a great weekend!

Sunset over the Columbia River from Munra Point, Oregon.

Sunset over the Columbia River from Munra Point, Oregon.  Wide-angles don’t always mean low camera positions!

Botswana's Okavango Delta, a waterworld!

Botswana’s Okavango Delta, a watery wonderland!

Wordless Wednesday: Genuine   4 comments

Buckaroo

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