Archive for the ‘Cascade Mountains’ Category

Mount St Helens – Early Season   4 comments

The Hummocks near Mount St. Helens is an area filled with remnant debris from the devastating eruption of 1980.

The Hummocks near Mount St. Helens is an area filled with remnant debris from the devastating eruption of 1980.

I visited the north side of Mount St. Helens yesterday with my uncle and my dog.  St. Helens is a sleeping volcano, by far the most active in the Cascade Range.  It erupted with extreme violence on May 18th, 1980, killing 57 people.  Now it is a National Monument managed by the U.S. Forest Service, and is in full-on recovery mode.

Since the monument is only partially open now, the snow just having recently melted off the highway, we had it to ourselves.  And what a gorgeous day to be there with only a few other lucky souls!  The mountain was glittering with rapidly melting snow, the water was pouring down through creeks and over waterfalls, and the birds and amphibians were busy with their lives on the shores of full lakes and ponds.

Beautiful Coldwater Lake at Mount St. Helens in Washington state.

Beautiful Coldwater Lake at Mount St. Helens in Washington state.

GEOLOGY

This whole area was transformed by the eruption of St Helens in 1980.  The volcano awoke on March 16th of that year with a series of small earthquakes.  A week and a half later the mountain erupted, blasting a small crater out of the snow-covered summit.  The mountain then proceeded to work up to its big blast 8 weeks later.  The north flank of the mountain slowly bulged outward as magma moved upward.

Finally, on that beautiful Sunday morning, while folks were in church or tending their gardens, the bulge gave way and history’s largest recorded landslide occurred.  The volcano was essentially uncorked, and as the massive debris avalanche slid toward Spirit Lake (where Harry Truman – the old character who refused to evacuate his lakeside cabin – awaited his fate), the mountain erupted in a powerful lateral blast.  It had the force of 24 megatons, 1600 times the energy released by the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan.  Whole forests were mowed down and the mountain’s height reduced by 1300 feet.

The mass of rock, mud and ash cascaded down the North Fork Toutle River valley, burying the river and damming Coldwater Creek.  These types of debris avalanches typically form mounds (hummocks) where the debris comes to rest, and this is what happened here.  Erosion by streams further sculpts the landscape.  Actually, this strange hummocky terrain, which occurs in places worldwide, was a bit of a puzzle to geologists before St. Helens showed geologists how it is formed.  Beautiful Coldwater Lake, along with the adjacent hummocks and melt-water ponds with their unique ecosystem, owe their existence to the 1980 landslide and eruption.  Volcanoes destroy, but they also create.

Coldwater Creek at Mount St. Helens near its confluence with the Toutle River.

Coldwater Creek at Mount St. Helens near its confluence with the Toutle River.

We hiked partway around Coldwater Lake.  We had planned to make the 12-mile loop around this rather large lake, which was created when the debris avalanche from the 1980 eruption dammed Coldwater Creek.  But a wide, tumbling creek stopped us.  I hopped across, getting my feet wet.  Seeing my uncle hesitate, I built a very rough bridge out of logs for him to cross.  But at age 73, he has gotten very cautious.  He just doesn’t like doing anything even remotely hazardous.  And stream crossings are something he REALLY does not like on a hike.  So we turned back.

The beautiful Coldwater Lake near Mount St. Helens was formerly covered with huge trees before the devastating eruption of 1980.

The beautiful Coldwater Lake near Mount St. Helens was formerly covered with huge trees before the devastating eruption of 1980.

I was pretty disappointed.  The hike around the lake was promising to be one spectacular trek.  I’ll just have to get back up there soon to do the whole thing.  But I snapped quickly out of my funk when we found a great alternative just across the road from the lake.

Trees are reflected in one of the many ponds at Mount St. Helens' Hummocks area in Washington.

Trees are reflected in one of the many ponds at Mount St. Helens’ Hummocks area in Washington.

The Hummocks Trail is a very interesting 2.5-mile loop through strange mounds created by the 1980 debris avalanche.  At this time of year there are beautifully full ponds trapped between the hummocks, alive with frogs, toads and salamanders.  The trail also passes a couple fantastic viewpoints up the Toutle River to the hulking volcano, with its horseshoe-shaped crater and (often steaming) lava dome.  Interpretive signs along the trail teach about the eruption and formation of the hummocks.

Algae combined with bubbling oxygen from a meltwater pond at Mount St. Helens forms fascinating patterns.

Algae combined with bubbling oxygen from a meltwater pond at Mount St. Helens forms fascinating patterns.

After a late picnic at Coldwater Lake, where we did some birdwatching and general lazing about, I headed back up the Hummocks Trail to one of the ponds for sunset pictures.  We made a full day of it after all, and didn’t get back to Portland until near 11 p.m.  It had been a couple years since I had been up to St. Helens, and I am determined to not let that much time go by again.  It is just too nearby, too special and beautiful a place to neglect.

The rapidly melting foothills near Mount St. Helens in Washington are reflected in meltwater ponds.

The rapidly melting foothills near Mount St. Helens in Washington are reflected in meltwater ponds.

To get there, travel north on I5 from Portland, Oregon (or south from Seattle).  Get off the freeway at the exit for Castle Rock and travel east on Highway 504 about 45 miles to Coldwater Lake.  During the summer season, this highway is open all the way to it’s end at Johnston Ridge Observatory, 7 miles on from the lake.  Find the trail around the lake either from the boat ramp or the Science & Learning Center up on the hill above the lake.  The Hummocks Trail is directly across Hwy. 504 from the turnoff for Coldwater Lake.  This part of Mount St. Helens is open from about late April until the snow flies in November.  Johnston Ridge is open from mid-May until late October.  There is an $8 fee to use Coldwater Lake or Johnston Ridge Observatories during the summer season.

Sundown at Mount St. Helens from the beautiful Hummocks area.

Sundown at Mount St. Helens from the beautiful Hummocks area.

Tamanawas Falls   7 comments

Tamanawas Creek in Oregon's Cascade Mountains has a beautiful Native American name that befits the scenery it offers on a springtime hike.

Tamanawas Creek in Oregon’s Cascade Mountains has a beautiful Native American name that befits the scenery it offers on a springtime hike.

I recently took the first hike since I broke my ribs.  It was only about 4 miles, along a glorious stream east of Mount Hood called Cold Spring Creek (I like calling it Tamanawas Creek though).  The hike heads a short way down the East fork of Hood River and turns up the rollicking creek to Tamanawas Falls.  This is an American Indian name, but I’ve had trouble tracking down its meaning.  It’s a beautiful hike and a beautiful waterfall.

By the way, I hope you enjoy these images.  Just click on any of them to go to the main part of my website, where purchase is possible.  They’re not available for free download, sorry.  The versions here are much too small anyway, but purchase as print or download of high-res. versions is possible by going here.  Please contact me if you have any questions.  Thanks for your interest!

The beautiful stream course of East Fork Hood River during spring melt-off.

The beautiful stream course of East Fork Hood River during spring melt-off.

To get there drive from Portland to Hood River on I-84.  At this town, get off the freeway and head up the Hood River Valley on Highway 35.  You’ll pass beautiful apple and pear orchards (which bloom around Easter), and in nice weather you’ll have grand views of Mount Hood.  Soon the road begins to be crowded by the valley walls as it heads into forest toward the mountain.  Before you begin climbing you will see a sign for Sherwood Campground.  Look for the trailhead on the right.  There will likely be other cars there.

The East Fork Hood River is fed by numerous springs along its upper reaches.

The East Fork Hood River is fed by numerous springs along its upper reaches.

From the trailhead walk into the woods and cross the East Fork Hood River on a log bridge.  Come immediately to a T-junction and take a right.  In a half mile or so you’ll curve into the canyon, then soon come to another wooden bridge.  Cross this and turn left at another junction, heading up Cold Spring Creek.  Follow this all the way to the falls.  Return the way you came.

Ripples form patterns in a rare quiet eddy along the energetic East Fork Hood River in Oregon.

Ripples form patterns in a rare quiet eddy along the energetic East Fork Hood River in Oregon.

The snow had just recently melted off the trail when I was there a few days ago, so this was the first time I photographed the curtain-like cascade with leftover snow.  It added an extra challenge to the photography, since the white of the snow wanted to blow-out (over-expose) whenever I properly exposed for the darker moss.  The even darker basalt that the falls flows over is nearly impossible to expose perfectly, but I think it’s fine to allow those areas to go nearly black.  Let me know what you think!

Tamanawas Falls comes into view framed by large fir trees.

Tamanawas Falls comes into view framed by large fir trees.

The trail offers many opportunities for communing with the rapids and small waterfalls along the way.  I used a circular polarizer for these shots.  Combined with a fairly small aperture and the fact that the sun was by that time too low to shine into the canyon, this gave me the long exposures that result in the smooth silky water.  Most of the photos had exposures on the order of 2-5 seconds, a few much longer (15-20 seconds).

Tamanawas Falls is a pretty waterfall near Mount Hood, Oregon.  In April the falls hastens the snow's retreat.

Tamanawas Falls is a pretty waterfall near Mount Hood, Oregon. In April the falls hastens the snow’s retreat.

Beautiful pools and small waterfalls occur along the trail to Tamanawas Falls near Mount Hood, Oregon.

Beautiful pools and small waterfalls occur along the trail to Tamanawas Falls near Mount Hood, Oregon.

Awash in Waterfalls   9 comments

A little-known waterfall in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge requires much effort to reach, being set in a pristine and beautiful alcove not accessible by trail.

A little-known waterfall in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge requires much effort to reach, being set in a pristine and beautiful alcove not accessible by trail.

The waterfalls of the Pacific Northwest are both abundant and beautiful.  When I travel to other places in the world, and hear of a waterfall to check out, I always try to dial back my expectations so I’m not disappointed.  We are so spoiled around here.  Of course when we’re talking Angel or Victoria Falls, or even those in Yosemite closer to home, that’s different.  Those waterfalls are world-renowned for good reason.

Victoria Falls, which sits on the Zambia-Zimbabwe border, is one of the world's great cascades.

Victoria Falls, which sits on the Zambia-Zimbabwe border, is one of the world’s great cascades.

Waterfalls of the Gorge – Formation & Geology

The Columbia River Gorge, which slices through the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest along the border between Oregon and Washington, has an abundance of waterfalls.  In fact the Cascades were named for all these cascades along the length of the volcanic chain.  Most of the waterfalls in the Gorge are located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River.  This is because the south side of the river faces north, and so is kept cooler and much wetter than the drier, south-facing Washington side.

Most Oregon waterfalls drop over basalt cliffs, such as Toketee on the North Umpqua River.  This is not surprising, since basalt is a very hard rock, prone to forming cliffs resistant to erosion.

Most Oregon waterfalls drop over volcanic basalt, such as Toketee on the North Umpqua River. This is not surprising, since basalt is a very hard rock, prone to forming cliffs resistant to erosion.

Why are there so many waterfalls here?  Well to start with the climate is wet.  The Columbia’s active and ancient down-cutting, combined with the fact that rocks on either side are very hard volcanic basalt, means that the smaller tributary valleys are left perched above the level of the Columbia.  The Missoula Floods, which were the biggest in world history as far as we know, raced through here more than 10,000 years ago.  These deluges scoured and further deepened the Gorge, helping to sculpt the steep sides down which the waterfalls tumble.

This geological setting has given us easy access to the waterfalls, a fact best illustrated by Multnomah Falls, which can be seen from Interstate 84.  Multnomah is Oregon’s highest cascade at 620 feet (189 meters) total, in two tiers.  Multnomah Creek is busy eroding the basalt of course, but its progress is much slower than the Columbia’s (which is also much older).  And so the cliff that the waterfall drops over stands very near to the creek’s mouth.  Realize that waterfalls erode their cliffs such that over time they move backward, upstream.

Multnomah Falls is Oregon's highest waterfall and one of its most popular tourist attractions.  Here it is in full flood.  The bridge crosses just above the lower cascade and a trail continues to the top of the tall upper cascade.

Multnomah Falls is Oregon’s highest waterfall and one of its most popular tourist attractions. Here it is in full flood. The bridge crosses just above the lower cascade and a trail continues to the top of the tall upper cascade.

There are some larger streams in the Columbia Gorge, such as Eagle Creek, that do not tumble over a tall cliff near their confluence with the Columbia River.  These streams are eroding softer formations, often following fractures or faults that make their jobs even easier.  They are larger streams because of this easier erosion, not the other way around.  Softer rock formations equals larger drainage basins and thus more water captured by the stream.

These side-gorges are not lacking waterfalls however, far from it.  One simply needs to hike up them to get to the cascades.  Your hike will have the added benefit of leaving behind the traffic noiset from he busy interstate.  You will generally be hiking through a narrow and lush gorge.  Eagle Creek, in fact, is one of the most stunning hikes of this type to be found in the world.

A small but beautiful waterfall called Faery Falls in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge.

A small but beautiful waterfall called Faery Falls in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge.

Off-the-Beaten-Track Waterfalls

Now on to this past weekend’s waterfall adventures.  I was on a mission not to visit and photograph those waterfalls with easy access, nor even those along one of the many trails in the Gorge.  My goal was to find at least one new waterfall, at least new for me.  Since I’ve hiked all through this area, that meant going off-trail.  With the recent wet weather, and also the new spring growth, I was in for some wet and messy travel through thick, slippery and potentially nasty brush and down logs.

The first hike was up McCord Creek to see if I could find some small cascades above beautiful Elowah Falls.  The going was pretty rough, and I decided to turn around in order to have the opportunity to visit both Upper McCord Creek Falls and Elowah Falls.  The two are actually so close together you can consider them to be two tiers of a single waterfall.  I could not get a unique angle on Upper McCord Creek Falls, so I”m not posting a picture of this one.  For Elowah, which is accessible by a trail, I wanted to get a good angle from near mid-point of the stream below the tall (220 feet) cascade.  It was raining and the flow was very high.  I got blasted with water from the falls when I passed it on the trail.  Then I clambored out onto a log to reach a mid-stream rock.  I set up there, but had a lot of trouble keeping my lens dry.  The resulting haze gives the picture a bit of a dreamy look, I think.  I will return to this spot when it’s not raining.

Elowah Falls in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge drops into a lush alcove filled with mossy boulders.

Elowah Falls in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge drops into a lush alcove filled with mossy boulders.

The second hike was up Moffett Creek, which enters just east of McCord.  Moffett Creek is a fun one to hike up, primarily because there is no trail.  This is best done in late summer when flows are low enough to wade up the creek where necessary.  This time of year is a different story.  I tried hiking up the creek to reach nearby Wahe Falls (also known as Moffett Crk. Falls).  But it quickly became obvious that the stream (which requires constant crossing) was flowing with too much power to negotiate the route safely.  I turned around and hiked up onto the side of the valley, following the Munra Point Trail.  I soon left the trail and started traversing up the side of the valley, aiming for where I thought the falls were.  It was steep, slippery and very tough going.

A forest of cedars surrounds the waterfall on Moffett Creek in Oregon's Columbia River Gorge.

A forest of cedars surrounds Wahe Falls on Moffett Creek in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge.

I was about to give up when I glimpsed the falls through the trees.  That gave me hope and I gutted out the last steep, thick section.  It’s an 80-foot single drop waterfall, seen by very few people (especially during spring flood).  There is a beautiful cedar tree near its base.  As per usual, it started raining steadily as I set up.  But I managed to get a couple good shots before calling it good.  It was near dark by the time I got out of there, soaking wet and muddy, but with a nice feeling of accomplishment.  There are more cascades further up Moffett Creek.  But that requires climbing gear, a partner or two, and lower water flows.  This is very rugged country.

Hope you enjoyed this illustrated primer on waterfalls.  I will post more waterfall photos on an irregular basis.  Just click on the pictures if you’re interested in prints or download rights.  You will need to click “add image to cart” and then make your choices.  Don’t worry, they won’t be added to your cart until you decide what you want.  The images are copyrighted and illegal to download for free, sorry.  Thanks for your interest, and thanks for reading!

Not a waterfall, but I needed a sunset shot to end this.  Crown Point and the Columbia River Gorge

Not a waterfall, but I needed a sunset shot to end this post! Crown Point and the Columbia River Gorge.

Cross-country Skiing at Mt Hood   14 comments

Mount Hood peeks above the fir trees during a cross-country ski outing in Oregon's Cascade Mountains.

Mount Hood peeks above the fir trees during a cross-country ski outing in Oregon’s Cascade Mountains.

It grew cold and snowed in our mountains during the first week of spring.  When the storm broke I took the opportunity to go up to Mount Hood and ski.  Whenever I tell somebody I have gone skiing they immediately assume downhill skiing.  I mostly cross-country ski nowadays, though I still love downhill.  It was a beautiful day.

If you are looking for a good place to begin your winter exploration of Mt Hood (on skis or snowshoes), I think Trillium Lake is a good choice.  Those who know the area well might scoff at this choice.  After all, it is fairly popular and can get crowded.  It is very easy to find, however, and offers the option of quickly losing the crowds to ski very beautiful terrain.

Mount Hood stands near snow-covered Trillium Lake on a full moon ski.

Mount Hood stands near snow-covered Trillium Lake on a full moon ski.

Trillium Lake Snowpark lies just a few miles east of the pass at Government Camp, along Highway 26.  Coming from Portland it is on your right.  You immediately descend into a beautiful basin.  On skis it is quite an exciting descent, but because you are following a wide snow-covered road, there is plenty of width to snowplow.  From the bottom you can do like 95% of folks do and circle Trillium Lake.  This is a fantastic option for a beginner (who would probably take off skis and walk down the big hill).

Ice clings to moss along a cross-country skiing trail in Oregon.

Ice clings to moss along a cross-country skiing trail in Oregon.

If you are more of an intermediate, or adventurous novice, go straight ahead at the bottom of the hill.  Then take your first left, climbing up a hill, still on a logging road, to start the Mud Creek Loop.  You will leave most other skiers and shoers behind.  From this loop, you have a couple other options aside from staying on the loop road.  About a mile up, you will see the signed Quarry Trail take off to the right.  This fairly narrow trail descends through open areas and shortens the loop.  You can leave the trail and cut long beautiful turns if you have the ability.

There are plenty of beautiful details to admire on a cross-country ski outing.

There are plenty of beautiful details to admire on a cross-country ski outing.

On Saturday I did a favorite trail of mine, the Lostman.  Other than the name, I like this narrow loop trail for its beauty and generally great snow conditions.  Look for the signed trail leaving Mud Creek Road on the left.  The trail is narrow but not steep, only about a couple miles in length.  You will invariably have it to yourself.  Keep a close watch on the blue diamonds though, because the trail’s name is very appropriate.  You come back out on Mud Creek Road, where you can either turn right to retrace your route back to Trillium Lake or continue the main loop by turning left.

Beautiful Mount Hood is illuminated by alpenglow.  Mirror Lake is at bottom.

Beautiful Mount Hood is illuminated by alpenglow. Mirror Lake is at bottom.

After doing Lost Man, I headed up to Mirror Lake specifically for taking sunset photos of Mount Hood.  This is a short climb on a popular summer trail that leaves Highway 26 just west of the Ski Bowl ski area.  I climbed above Mirror Lake for these last three shots.  The powder snow was deep!  It kicked my butt!  I was a bit too late for perfect light, as the sun set into a cloud bank along the horizon.  But I was happy to have made it in time for a good picture of Hood.  I swept several telemark turns down through the powder under a nearly full moon, as the temperature rapidly dropped.

A crystal-clear and cold evening under the moonlight skiing near Mount Hood, Oregon.

A crystal-clear, cold evening under the moonlight skiing near Mount Hood, Oregon.

What a day!  I hope you enjoyed the pictures.  Click on any of them for purchase options, and to peruse the main portfolio section of my website.  These versions are low-res and are not available for free download anyway (they’re copyrighted).  Thanks for your interest and cooperation.

Mount Hood stands alone, surrounded by forest, during the beginning of dusk.

Mount Hood stands alone, surrounded by forest, during the beginning of dusk.

Friday Foto Talk: Disappointment   6 comments

Frozen Mirror Lake in Mount Hood National Forest, Oregon.

Frozen Mirror Lake in Mount Hood National Forest, Oregon.

My goal with these weekly topics is to cover things that are not covered well in other photo blogs, but which nevertheless must be faced and dealt with by every photographer.  So many photography blogs tend to be a little too technical (hello, it’s an art form!) or at the opposite extreme so filled with attempts to elicit chuckles that you wonder at the end if there was anything useful to take away.

When I first started taking pictures there were a few photography classes (which I couldn’t afford), and that was it.  Sure, a few photo how-to books were on the shelves, but I wasn’t into reading books on how to take pictures, I was into taking pictures!  Nowadays of course there are a bazillion ways to learn about photography.  The dirty little secret?  There is not all that much to learn (in a hushed voice); the rest is gained by doing.

So with that little dig directed at the photography education “industry” I will talk about something near and dear to my heart: disappointment.  Last Friday’s topic was on technique, this one isn’t (I like variety, what can I say).

If you are just getting going with photography, particularly landscape and/or nature photography, you will soon be very familiar with disappointment.  You’ll realize being skunked when you go out to get that epic shot is a more common occurrence than being blessed with a special image or three.  The key is to give yourself permission to be disappointed, but not to feel discouraged.

As you go along, you’ll naturally want certain pictures, and it’s often very specific light, foreground, etc. that you imagine capturing.   I live in Oregon and though I have 50 or 60 of my framed photographs on the walls, I don’t yet have a picture of Mount Hood.  Sure I have good shots of Hood, but I haven’t captured Oregon’s highest mountain in its snow-clad, alpenglow-tinged, crystal winter-light magnificence.  I might print and frame a shot of some monastery high in the Himalayas that is merely good.  The exotic location makes it worth framing, despite minor flaws.  But I somehow can’t allow an iconic mountain so close to home to be displayed in any other way than pure excellence.  Some days the mountain never crosses my mind; on other days it’s all I can think about.

That was the case today when I saw the perfect weather conditions developing.  I wanted a snowy winter portrait of Hood with plenty of clouds in the sky and the kind of light pervading the atmosphere that only cold weather can provide.  I drove up in the afternoon and parked near a trail that heads up to a frozen lake directly southwest of the mountain: Mirror Lake.  The exact viewpoint I was headed for, being halfway up a steep slope, is not one used other photographers.  A similar photo can be captured higher up at the top of Tom Dick & Harry Mountain (nice name, huh?), and this is a fairly popular place with local photographers.  But my hopes were for a better foreground.  Since the sun sets south of west these days, and since the snow gave easier access to the bouldery slope, I was destined to be in the right place at the right time, just before sunset.

Tom Dick & Harry Peak.  Actually this is Dick, one of the triple peaks.  They stand above Mirror Lake near Mt Hood, Oregon.

Tom Dick & Harry Mtn. Actually this is Dick, one of the triple peaks. They stand above Mirror Lake near Mt Hood, Oregon.

I donned cross-country skis and set out.  I climbed up to the lake, took a few shots, and continued up the steep slope behind the lake.  It got steeper and steeper, and I struggled a bit.  All the while, I noticed the mountain was peeping in and out of dramatic clouds.  I had high hopes.  Just as the light started turning golden, I grunted up the last few yards before it leveled out.  I’m not one to wax on about great dangerous adventures while taking photos, but the avalanche danger was definitely very near my comfort limit.

I began to notice some clouds coming in.  It had been showing signs of clearing, so I ignored the ominous grey blobs in the sky.  But as I crested the top, it began to snow, and I looked over to see…nothing.  Actually there was something, a dull grey expanse where there should have been a mountain.  I could even see, peeking through, swatches of perfect magenta light on one ridge of Hood.  But the clouds formed a very effective shroud.

I waited for a miracle, but it didn’t happen.  I had been clouded out.  After having spent time, money (for gas) and sweaty effort, I had nothing to show for it – zip, zilch, nada!  I had little time to sulk though, because it began to get dark.  I quickly realized my vulnerable position and skied back down to the lake.  A dozen or so nice powder turns was my reward, and this was certainly something!  After all light had gone but a dull red glow on the western horizon, the clouds quickly dissipated and the mountain came right out.  So typical!

Skiing out on Mirror Lake as the sun goes down.

Skiing out on Mirror Lake as the sun goes down.

Here is the lesson you might have learned already.  Unless you set up lights and can control most aspects of the shoot (except for which side of the bed your model woke up on), you will be forever at the mercy of capricious mother nature.  You will do best to get the pictures you can, but there is no avoiding the desire to capture some favorite subject in a specific way.  That’s when you are set up for the big D.  Just as with life, it is important to take all of your photography disappointments in stride too.  Get a few pictures if you can, but learn that you can live to fight another day.

Whatever you do, don’t give up.  Return to that spot again when the weather conditions are dynamic and unpredictable.  Do not return when the skies are impossibly clear and there is no chance for getting clouded out.  Why?  Because that will not give you the picture you really want.  You see, what we really want is something on the edge of being there and not there.  This diaphanous thing will only exist one day out of a hundred, and only for a few minutes at that.  Remember that persistence will eventually give you a picture that is worthy of hanging on yours or anyone else’s wall.  And most important, you will have earned it through your own dogged determination, all the while having the odd adventure and more than one brush with disappointment.

Mount Hood is completely covered with clouds just in time for a glorious sunset.

Disappointment: Mount Hood is completely covered with clouds just in time for a glorious sunset.

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