Archive for the ‘Animals’ Category

Two for Tuesday: We’re Coming!   2 comments

If you want to see desert bighorn sheep, you can’t do much better than east Zion National Park in Utah.  Not the canyon itself so much; that can be a zoo in the warmer months.  If you travel east, through a couple spectacular tunnels, you come out in a wonderland of sandstone monoliths.  The bighorn sheep here are doing quite well.

I drove through my favorite part of Zion a couple days ago, stopping to take a short hike.  I saw two sheep browsing the spring growth and slowly pursued them, hoping they’d get comfortable with me.  They crossed the road and I crossed behind them.  Then I saw the babies & another female.

Mom was understandably shy about letting me get close to them, so I just watched as they climbed the steep sandstone.  Mom reached a viewpoint, but the kids were more careful.  They took their time, making sure each step was placed right.

Now they were very visible from the road and a few other cars stopped.   But since I had been with them for awhile, I ended up with a nice series, not just the one with them surveying their domain.  Stories and behavior are what I always hope for with wildlife.  I used my newish 600 mm. lens.  Enjoy!

Wait up mom, we’re coming!

Try and reach us now, haha!

 

Wordless Wednesday: In Florida!   8 comments

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Two for Tuesday: Characters   9 comments

 

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Single-image Sunday: Annoyed   6 comments

Bet ya think I’m going to talk about being annoyed.  No, even when I am annoyed I’ll try never to subject anyone else to my reasons for being so.  They only make sense at the time anyway.  No, this image is all about this buffalo (otherwise known as a bison) being annoyed with me.  If you’re familiar with American bison, you know they once roamed over most of the central parts of North America.  And that now they’re confined mostly to a few national parks, Yellowstone chief among them.

So you may think this shot is from Yellowstone, or possibly nearby Grand Teton National Park.  You may even know about the buffalo herd at Wind Cave, South Dakota, and think he lives there.

None of the above!  The truth is that I got a surprise when I visited the southern part of Oklahoma recently.  I had seen on the map that there was a wildlife refuge called Wichita Mountains NWR.  I also saw on the web that there were a small number of buffalo there.  Since it was a quick trip, I didn’t expect to see many buffalo, let alone get close enough for a good shot.

Towards dusk I happened to glance off into the trees while driving by and saw this youngish bull.  I stopped and walked around behind him.  Approaching slowly and watchfully, I kept some small trees between he and I.

Annoyed: check out his underside.

Annoyed: check out his underside.

I’ve learned to be cautious around buffalo, but how cautious often depends.  At times you can walk right up to them, drawing no more than a casual glance.  I don’t set out wanting to get too close of course.  But on several occasions while hiking in Yellowstone, I’ve rounded a corner and been confronted with one of the massive beasts lounging in the grass beside the trail.  If it is not autumn, this is not usually a panic situation.

I got close enough to this one to get his attention.  He immediately let me know that I had gotten close enough, thank you.  He turned and took a couple steps in my direction, fixing me with a glare.  If that wasn’t enough, he began to urinate.  That was my clue to back away.  There is a rule of thumb with any large (or even not so large) male animal.  Almost anytime you see them urinating, you can be sure it’s to send a definite signal: stay back!

There are other fairly obvious signals that buffalo give you.  One is when they arch their tail up in the air.  I’ve seen bulls do that during mating season, just before charging another bull.  Another clue is when they throw their huge furry heads about.  If you come upon a buffalo with an arched tail, who’s throwing his head around and urinating at the same time, you should definitely not approach any closer.  And strongly consider retreating.

Many tourists have been injured, some even killed, by bison.  At Yellowstone especially, people often approach too closely in an attempt to get a good picture.  They ignore the obvious warning signals that the bison (I think kindly) is giving them.  When questioned by rangers, some of these people don’t realize that they are wild animals.  And they seem to believe they are slow and ponderous.

True, buffalo go about most of their lives in slow-motion.  But that’s deceiving.  I’ve seen them run very fast and jump 6-foot high fences.  That’s 1500 pounds launching itself over a high fence!  When they want to be, buffalo can be very athletic and very cantankerous – a potentially deadly combination.  It’s amazing to me that more people aren’t rammed and gored, given how many apparently unobservant tourists visit Yellowstone.

So if you plan to visit one of the parks with buffalo, remember the signals, especially if it’s the fall mating season.  Stay safe, and have a great week!

Friday Foto Talk: Depth of Field III   13 comments

This Friday I’d like to continue with depth of field. But before I do I want to thank all those who contributed to my campaign to replace my camera gear (which tumbled over a waterfall several months back) and get back to showing you all some fresh material on this blog. I will be sending out a reminder email to those folks, to pick the images they want.

I didn’t make it all the way to my goal, but I got partway there. And that means something. I’m busy right now working 7 days/week doing the only thing I know how to do that makes me money quickly. And it’s actually legal, go figure! So it won’t be long before I make up the difference myself.

Make sure and check out the first two parts of this series: Part I and Part II.  They go over the basics behind depth of field.  The example here will show how to apply those basic principles in the field, so it’s important to know them.

Cape Ground Squirrel

I was traveling through Namibia when I took a break from the road.  Namibia is one country in Africa where you can very easily rent a car and take off on an impromptu road trip, like you would in the western U.S.  If the roads in the west were still largely unpaved that is.  

I strolled up a small ridge with my camera and one lens (a 400 mm.).  Suddenly directly ahead this cute little fellow popped his head up and looked at me with big dark eyes.  I had never encountered this rather tall slender rodent before.  Later I found out it was a cape ground squirrel, native to southern Africa.

Of course I wanted a shot of him, and quickly before he decided I wasn’t all that interesting.  But as usual my position wasn’t ideal.  A portion of the scrubby hillside formed the background not far behind him.  My lens only opened up to a maximum aperture of f/5.6.

Since I wanted a portrait that showed him plus a bit of the bare ground at his feet but little else, the hillside was a problem.  It was too close and would have been too much in focus, too distracting.  I wanted as shallow a depth of field as I could get.  But I was limited in what I could do.  I couldn’t open the aperture larger than f/5.6, couldn’t go longer than 400 mm., and couldn’t change lenses.

I was down to one option, changing relative distance between camera to subject and subject to background.  And since I couldn’t move closer without scaring him off, increasing the subject to background distance was all I had.

I grabbed a quick shot or two, in case he ran away. Then I slid down low, lying on my belly so that the hillside behind him was out of view. Now a much more distant ridge formed the background.  Problem was, the lower point of view put my little friend out of view.

So I waited, hoping that his curiosity would get the best of him.  Sure enough he popped his head up again.  Luckily his long tail (which is what fascinated me about him in the first place) trailed to the side.  I had been framing a vertical photo, but I quickly switched to get his tail in and fired off a few frames before he zipped off to continue his daily desert rounds.

The Cape ground squirrel lives in rocky areas of Namibia and South Africa.

The Cape ground squirrel lives in rocky areas of Namibia and South Africa.

I ended up with a pretty good shot of him, a key part of it being the smooth gray out of focus background. The shallow depth of field was afforded by a relatively long focal length of 400 mm. combined with the squirrel’s proximity to me relative to the distance between him and the ridge behind.  The low point of view resulted in the picture’s main weakness, an out of focus rock low in the foreground.

I tend to combine all the factors controlling depth of field (aperture, focal length and positioning).  But since focal length is pretty much dictated by the composition I’m after, aperture and positioning are the main variables.  I’ll move closer or farther from my subject, change point of view to move background forward or back, or ask my subject to move if that’s possible (I haven’t figured out how to speak to animals yet).  All the while I will adjust aperture to the degree that I can.

Of course I run into shutter speed limitations when adjusting aperture.  But it’s easy to mitigate that by adjusting ISO.  Better to have a little noise from a higher ISO than to have a blurry subject because of a shutter speed that is too slow.  I have ruined many a shot because I thought animals or people were perfectly still when they weren’t.  I’ve been a very slow learner in this regard.  Always shoot live subjects at somewhat faster shutter speeds than you think are necessary. 

Travel Theme: Dry   17 comments

It’s been too long since I’ve participated in Ailsa’s travel theme posts.  This week the topic is Dry.  Enjoy these images from southern Africa.  I was there for three months a couple years ago, at a time that straddled the end of the dry and beginning of the wet seasons.  My better desert landscapes are from the American Southwest, but these show the real impact of dry.

It was amazing the sense of anticipation among the animals (and also people) as they awaited the rains.  It is for many of them a time of life and death, a time of anxiety.  This is especially true with respect to their young.  Most animals there have babies not long before the wet season.  Then they have to wait out the worst days, the end of the dry season while watching their young suffer.  Maybe it’s a way for them to make sure the young are strong, I don’t know.

If you are interested in any of these images (copyrighted and not available for free download), please click on them.  If you have any questions or specific requests, please contact me.  Enjoy and thanks for looking!

A lone wildebeest stands watching the wet season's first storm sweep into the Mbabe Depression of Botswana.  No rain came at first, only wind and incredible dust.  A moment after I shot this, the wildebeest ran for shelter.

A lone wildebeest stands watching the wet season’s first storm sweep into the Mbabe Depression of Botswana. No rain came at first, only wind and incredible dust. A moment after I shot this, the wildebeest ran for shelter.

A clump of grass grows at the base of an enormous orange dune in Namibia's Namib Desert.

A clump of grass grows at the base of an enormous orange dune in Namibia’s Namib Desert.

A large female African elephant shades her baby from the hot direct sun during the hottest days of the year in Botswana's Chobe National Park.

A large female African elephant shades her baby from the hot direct sun during one of the hottest days of the year in Botswana’s Chobe National Park.

The standing snags of camel thorn trees trace a dry watercourse in Namibia.  the mountain-sized dunes of the Namib Desert lie in the background.

Standing snags of camel thorn trees trace a dry watercourse in Namibia. Mountain-sized dunes of the Namib Desert lie in the background.

Ostriches seemed to be most abundant in the dry grasslands of Namibia.

Ostriches seemed to be most abundant in the dry grasslands of Namibia.

During their incredible migration into the Makgadikgadi Pans of Botswana, a zebra mom uses her tail brushes insects away from her foal.

During their incredible migration into the Makgadikgadi Pans of Botswana, a zebra mom uses her tail to brush insects away from her foal.

A desert plated lizard in the dunes of the Namib desert uses its armored head to dig quickly into the sand.

A desert plated lizard in the dunes of the Namib desert uses its armored head to dig quickly into the sand.

Plants adapted to dry conditions normally grow very slowly, but it's hard to beat the ancient Welwitschia of Namibia.  Some are well over 2000 years old.

Plants adapted to dry conditions grow very slowly, but it’s hard to beat the ancient Welwitschia of Namibia. Some are well over 2000 years old.

The long horns and large ears are characteristic features of the gemsbok, an antelope living in arid regions of Africa.

The long horns and large ears are characteristic features of the gemsbok, an antelope superbly adapted to the arid regions of Africa.

This lioness in Botswana's Kalahari Desert is preserving her energy during an incredibly hot day in order to hunt in the relative cool of the evening.  Wish I had as good an excuse to be lazy!

This lioness in Botswana’s Kalahari Desert is preserving her energy during an incredibly hot day in order to hunt (the above animal) in the relative cool of the evening. Wish I had as good an excuse to be lazy!

Namibia's Skeleton Coast is by far the driest, most empty place I've been, an extremely arid coast with plenty of shipwrecks.

Namibia’s Skeleton Coast is by far the driest, most empty place I’ve been, an extremely arid shore with plenty of shipwrecks.

Anyone who has spent a lot of time in deserts knows about the annoyingly dry thing that happens inside your nose.  This giraffe in the Kalahari has the solution!

Anyone who has spent a lot of time in deserts knows about the annoying, dry thing that happens inside your nose. This giraffe in the Kalahari has the solution!

Then he smiled mockingly at me for having far too short a tongue!

Then he seemed to smile mockingly at me for having far too short a tongue!

A mirage of a lake appears on Namibia's Skeleton Coast.

A mirage of a lake appears on Namibia’s Skeleton Coast.

Sunset in the dunes of the Namib Desert.

Sunset in the dunes of the Namib Desert.

Wordless Wednesday: Desert Bighorn Sheep   9 comments

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Beaver Sign   6 comments

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This is a follow-up to my little puzzler last Wednesday.  The picture above was accompanied by the question, “Who made these tracks?”  Jakz guessed correctly that it was a beaver.  All the clues are there, from the tail dragging as he waddled back to the pond with his load to the marks made by the aspen tree he was dragging.  At upper left you can see the tracks he made on the way to the “harvest zone”.  He wasn’t loaded down yet, so there is little sign of tail dragging.

The Colorado mountains are chock full of beaver sign now.  These are the same mountains that drew all those trappers in the early 1800s.  Men like Jim Bridger, Hugh Glass, John Colter, the Meek Brothers (with their unfitting surname), and my favorite character, Jedediah Smith.  These colorful characters were inspiration for the legendary image of the Mountain Man.  And they were definitely colorful.  Consider Grizzly Adams and Liver-eating Johnson.

I have always wished I was born then, wished I had lived the life of a mountain man.  They trapped out these mountains, supplying the beaver pelts for all those top hats worn by fashionable Europeans.  Succeeding decades saw continuous pressure on beaver populations.  But the beaver are definitely back now!

Here are a couple other shots I got on that (freezing) morning walk at over 11,000 feet.  Despite all the sign, I haven’t yet spotted one of the industrious critters on this trip.  When I do I’ll post the pictures.  Hope everyone’s weekend is going well.

This is just a close-up of the ice forming along the edges of the beaver pond near where I saw the tracks.

This is a close-up of the ice forming along the edges of the beaver pond near where I saw the tracks.

A large beaver pond reflects a high mountain in the Colorado Rockies.

A large beaver pond reflects a high mountain in the Colorado Rockies.

Wordless Wednesday: Guess who made the tracks!   10 comments

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Mountain Monday: Maroon Bells & Moose   7 comments

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No internet for the past few days, so I missed Single-image Sunday.  I know about Macro Monday, but having been in the mountains, this seems more appropriate. This post is all about the letter M!

I’m in the Rocky Mountains trying to soak up the last of autumn’s atmosphere.  It seems that this year winter is coming early to these parts.  I did some morning photos at Maroon Lake the other day. Finishing up at a small beaver pond, I had already gotten ready to leave when this cow moose showed up.  She quickly waded right into the pond and began to munch away on the water plants, plunging her big head all the way under and coming up with a mouth-full of moss and such.

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I’ve had the opportunity to see moose wading belly deep on numerous occasions.  But I’ve never had this spectacular a backdrop at the same time as having camera equipment at the ready.  The mountains are called the Maroon Bells, fairly famous because of their proximity to Aspen.

If you are interested in any of these images please contact me.  I’m on the road now and will not have them up on my website until I can get to a faster connection. Clicking on any of the pictures will take you to the gallery on my site that is animal-focused.  Thanks for reading and have a fantastic week!

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