Friday Foto Talk: Point of View, Part I   2 comments

An image from Guatemala, where just the right point of view on the street created interesting angles.

Having tackled fairly heavy topics recently, it’s back to basics this week.  Basic but definitely not trivial.  Although point of view could describe your own subjective take on the subjects you shoot (part of your style), the term is used most often in photography to describe the physical location of your camera.  It’s abbreviated to POV.

It boils down to a very simple idea:  constantly vary your points of view.  Don’t stand in one place, and don’t shoot from the same height above ground.  Move around; get low, lower, and even all the way to the ground; shoot from under your subject; get high and shoot directly down on the scene.

Snow Canyon State Park, Utah offers some amazing points of view. It felt like I was perched atop a huge animal’s foot here.

Point of View:  Angle & Position

When we start out in photography we tend to shoot with the sun behind us so that our subjects are illuminated.  This is natural and not a bad way to go (exposure is a breeze, for one).  Then we see something interesting and naturally turn our cameras that way.  We just changed our angle of view.

But then, as novices, we stop there.  We don’t vary that angle.  We don’t look behind us very much.  We also don’t consider the direction that the light is coming from.  Better photography comes from shooting in more than one direction (look behind you!) and from remembering the light.

For this one of a termite tower in the Okavango Delta, I moved close to it and shot upward to emphasize its height.

For this one of a termite tower in the Okavango Delta, I moved close to it and shot upward to emphasize its height.

To start varying POV, simply turn a bit and take a shot.  Go ahead and continue to rotate through the entire 360 degrees of the compass, shooting as you go.  But this is just panning.  It’s important to change position too, particularly for close-up subjects.  That will bring you closer or further away from your foreground subject relative to various backgrounds.

The idea is to vary POV by combining changes in position with changes in angle of view.  But not in a half-hazard or willy-nilly manner.  Don’t be that indecisive photographer you sometimes see, constantly putting the camera up to his eyes, swinging it around and zooming in and out, hoping to land on a good shot.  It’s not necessarily a bad thing using your camera to test compositions, but I recommend the following.

Avoid pointing your camera hither and thither before you decide on a shot.  Use your feet to change POV instead.  Use your unaided eyes and keep the wider view; you’ll see more.  I almost never put the camera up to my eye until I’m ready to shoot, then I shift or zoom only slightly to dial in the exact composition I want, paying special attention to the edges and corners where unwanted distractions may lurk.

So, in order to move with thought and purpose, read on…

  • POV and Subject:  Generally speaking getting closer to a subject makes for better pictures of it.  But let’s go beyond this simple yet important bit of advice.  When you have multiple elements in an image (a landscape with close-in foreground for example), changing position and angle of view changes perspective in significant ways.  Even for things that are further away it’s surprising how a small change in position can change the look of a picture.  Many shooters don’t appreciate this enough.  They don’t think it will matter to walk 10 or 20 yards (meters).  But it does (see images below).
Saratoga Springs, Death Valley, CA., from on top of a small hill.

Saratoga Springs, Death Valley, CA., from on top of a small hill.

A closer & lower POV than the image above, only taking a few minutes to walk down off the hill.

A closer & lower POV than the image above, only taking a few minutes to walk down off the hill.

  • POV, Background and Light:  Most of us go for the more spectacular, dramatic background.  But think about it first.  Where is the light coming from?  How will changing your position affect how the light falls on your subject or supporting foreground elements?  In a past Foto Talk I detailed how to use differing angles of sunlight in your photography.  That’s a good post to check out.

 

  • POV, Background and Composition:  If you change your POV to change background, how will that change how your overall composition works?  For example, will the color palette or texture of the background be consistent or clash in some way with your foreground or other elements?  I’m not saying don’t take the picture, but when you take a look on the computer later think about this stuff when you choose selects.
I had to get fairly close (but not too close!) to this buffalo for just the right balance with the background at Yellowstone National Park.

I had to get fairly close (but not too close!) to this buffalo for just the right balance with the background at Yellowstone National Park.

  • POV and Subject Weighting:  For relatively close subjects, where you stand and which direction you shoot may not only change the background; it may also change your subject’s relationship to it.  Will that more dramatic background overwhelm your subject, making it “disappear”?  How close do you want to be to your foreground?  Remember it’s your choice how much to emphasize a foreground subject.
Wanting both the covered bridge and Bollinger Mill, Missouri in the same shot, some careful positioning (and a wide angle) was necessary.

Wanting the covered bridge to be the main subject, I also wanted Bollinger Mill, Missouri in the same shot.  So careful positioning (and a wide angle) was necessary.

Next week’s Foto Talk will go into the ways that changing POV in terms of height affects your photography, with tips for varying things to get the best possible images.  Have a wonderful weekend and happy shooting!

It required careful positioning to get this image from Oklahoma. I didn't want the usual composition where the bales are front & center. The cottonwood was my focus.

It required careful positioning to get this image from Oklahoma. I didn’t want the usual composition where the bales dominate. Instead my focus was the cottonwood in warm light from the setting sun.

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2 responses to “Friday Foto Talk: Point of View, Part I

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  1. That buffalo shot with its yellow and purple natural contrast is awesome

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