Two for Tuesday: Close-up Signs of Spring   12 comments

Orange globe mallow in bloom.

Orange globe mallow in bloom.

Yesterday was the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere.  So in celebration here’s a Two for Tuesday post.  It’s where I post two photos that are related to each other in some way.

This pair shows a couple closely related signs of Spring.   During a splendid hike through a desert canyon recently, the season was springing forth in typical desert fashion.  Spring rarely bowls you over in the desert.  But the closer you look the more you see.  It’s why both of these are close-up shots.

The hummingbird surprised me at first when he buzzed by my head, looking straight at me hovering a couple feet away before zooming off to perch on his branch.  I wondered why he was there at first, but then walkiaround I found a spring with some flowers blooming.  In fact the further up the little draw I walked the more like a lush oasis it seemed.

This little hummer was spending part of his morning checking out the visitor to his little oasis near a spring in a desert canyon: Death Valley National Park.

This little hummer was spending part of his morning checking out the visitor to his little oasis near a spring in a desert canyon: Death Valley National Park.

Get out there and enjoy springtime (or autumn for my southern hemisphere friends).  And thanks for checking in!

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12 responses to “Two for Tuesday: Close-up Signs of Spring

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  1. Nice signs of spring. I hope to see some soon over here too 😉
    Amazing how you’ve captured this bird!

  2. Superb images!

  3. Reblogged this on chithankalai.

  4. Great light on the mallow and oh, how I love the beautiful hummingbird 😀 That must have been amazing having it flying close to you!

    • Thanks a bunch Sarah. He was a curious one for sure!

      • I need more curious birds over here 😉 I’ve been trying to photograph the kingfisher on the canal and not getting anything particularly usable. Lots of people walk and cycle the tow path so he’s not overly wary but he seems to know exactly when I’ve managed to get him in focus!!! I will be persevering on sunny days, when we next get a few.

        • Yes kingfishers can be frustrating for sure! So much patience required, and I’ve always had trouble with the belted kingfisher.

        • Now I have one on the canal I know where to go and park myself on sunny days with the tripod and long lens! I looked up the belted kingfisher and it’s about twice the size of our little European species. Not quite as flashy with colouring but the male has a great tuft 🙂 I read that it’s occasionally seen over in Ireland and some other parts of the UK when it’s migrated for winter! A rare occurrence though. Getting good photos of the kingfisher has been a dream of mine for ages. It’s hard enough to just find and watch one! It’s estimated that there are only around five thousand pairs in the whole of the UK!!

        • Wow only 5000, no wonder they’re a little skittish. Belted’s are very common here but they’re basically the only one you see. When I travel to other continents I see more species, smaller & more colorful. The Okavango Delta was a haven for them and you could get very close in mokoros (shallow-draft canoes you pole). My best kingfisher shot is from there.

        • Oh that’s in my dream trip list!!! I’m always left completely speechless when I watch amazing natural world documentaries of the delta. I want to go to Goa and Costa Rica too for the birds 😀

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