Storm in the Desert   2 comments

The meat of the winter storm moves across a barren southern Utah valley.

The meat of an early winter storm moves across an empty valley in southern Utah.

The first snowstorm of the winter moved across the desert southwest in the past few days.  When the desert gets snow, it is announced noisily beforehand by cold and wind.  But like most politicians it doesn’t fulfill all its blustery promise with much of a payoff – in this case snow.  The first night an inch or two came, and the second about five inches fell.  That morning I woke in Capital Reef National Park and there were large flakes slowly falling in a gentle, windless snow. Beautiful.

Morning reveals new-fallen snow in the old pioneer settlement of Fruita, Utah.  This is the one-room schoolhouse, which has been beautifully restored.

Morning reveals new-fallen snow in the pioneer settlement of Fruita, Utah. This is the one-room school, which has been beautifully restored.

This particular storm is neither the coldest nor the snowiest I have seen in these parts.  But for November its not bad.  Since I can remember I’ve enjoyed weather like this.  I always think it passes too quickly in the western U.S.  Alaska is the only place I’ve ever lived where weather like this can hang on for weeks.  This weather cay yield great pictures, but I can’t say I like messing with camera gear in cold, wet conditions.  I will post a Friday Foto Talk on how to deal with this potentially damaging issue surrounding winter shooting.

As I write this the weather has returned to typical conditions for the desert southwest; that is, cloudless blue skies.  Have a great week!

Goblin Valley is a hot place in summertime, but on this morning it was anything but.

Goblin Valley is a hot place in summertime, but on this morning it was anything but.

Advertisements

2 responses to “Storm in the Desert

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Beautiful – Goblin valley, the last photo, is stunningly beautiful. I love winter photos, but unfortunately my fingers turn white, stiff and aching – so, not much of photography during winter here.

Please don't be shy; your words are what makes my day!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: