Archive for July 2013

Wordless Wednesday: Big Smile   Leave a comment

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Travel Theme: Sweet   16 comments

Wow, look at me posting one a day – sort of.  Since I normally don’t post on Monday, I thought I’d participate in one of Ailsa’s Travel Themes, this time Sweet.  Check out her blog post on the subject for interpretations from many more folks.

Guatemalan Sweets

These images were taken in a little town up in the Guatemalan Highlands.  Even in today’s modern world, some of these towns really seem to have been frozen in time (at least partly).  Since my little room was just a block away, I strolled the main square at night, coming upon these unusual-looking sweets.  They stuff limes with sweet rice?  Wow!  I love limes, I love sweet rice!

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Next day I came upon this little sweetie playing with her friends just outside a village I walked to (no road access).   There were no adults in sight.  They were wild and free!  It’s sad that in this country nowadays the kids are kept under supervision all the time, the parents being scared of dangers exaggerated by the media. Why in my day…nevermind.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Masterpiece   27 comments

Instead of Single-Image Sunday this week I’ve decided to be a joiner for once.  I’m not generally a joiner, but I like the theme Masterpiece.  Also, I felt the need to view other people’s photography.  It’s like eating meat.  I don’t do it a lot, but occasionally I feel the need.  So I’m participating this week on the Postaday’s Weekly Photo Challenge.  Hope you enjoy the image.  Just click on it if you’re interested in purchase options.  It’s copyrighted and not available for free download, sorry.  If you have any questions, just contact me.  Thanks for looking!

A full moon lights this view from the North Rim westward down the length of the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

A full moon lights this view from the North Rim westward down the length of the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

This image, which I think I posted as part of a Grand Canyon theme some months ago, is one of my favorites.  It speaks to me of the unity between the earth and the cosmos.  I think of everything we can see in day and night, the earth and space, the whole shebang, as one enormous masterpiece.  This is the winter night sky, so it’s not like so many shots you see (including mine), where the Milky Way arcs across the sky.  Instead we’re looking outward toward inter-galactic space.  For me it makes the image even better.  You can also notice some left-over smoke from fires, drifting in low layers over the Canyon.

I almost didn’t capture it.  My foot was injured and I didn’t want to make the 1/2 mile hike in the darkness down to this viewpoint.  But the moon rose, nearly full, so I went ahead and limped down there.  When I arrived I didn’t see this composition.  I hopped the fence and carefully worked my way to the edge. Looking down into the black void was freaking me out, so I concentrated on the stars and the distant canyon.  I used a very wide angle, 15 mm.

The image is a combination of two images taken one after the other.  The first one was for the land, with a static camera, and the second was for the stars, tracking their apparent movement across the sky so they wouldn’t blur.  I have a tracking mount for my tripod.  I combined the two images in Photoshop to come up with an image very similar to what I saw that night.  This isn’t easy, matching your memory of the view with your final image.  It’s especially difficult with long-exposure night shots.  Hope you enjoy it.

Friday Foto Talk: Blue Hour   12 comments

Blue Hour on the California Coast. Clouds from an approaching winter storm lend a moody look.

Blue Hour on the California Coast. Clouds from an approaching winter storm lend a moody look.

Blue hour is often mentioned by photographers as offering great picture opportunities.  I definitely agree.  In case you don’t know, blue hour is that transitional time between sunset and darkness when the sky and land take on a blue color.  They also occur in the morning before sunrise.  The peak of blue hour is about 45 minutes after sunset (or before sunrise).  But it really is a transitional time which offers opportunities from the time of fading orange sunset glow to inky-black skies.  Here’s why I believe blue hour is worth staying out late or getting up early for:

      • Blue hour is..well…it’s blue!  Blue is a beautiful color.  It’s my favorite, and I’m not alone.  Everybody likes this color.  It easily imparts mood as well.
      • Blue hour can help to impart mood, but not only because of the blue color.  Low light forces longer exposures, which can lend an abstract quality to an image.  If clouds are present, they impart a moody counterpoint to any expanses of deep blue in sky or water.
The crescent moon at blue hour in the desert of the Baja Peninsula, Mexico.

The crescent moon at blue hour in the desert of the Baja Peninsula, Mexico.

      • Blue hour allows you to achieve long exposures without filters.  Filters are another piece of glass between you and the image, which in some cases can introduce artifacts or otherwise lower quality.  If you want to blur water or imply motion, shoot ghost-like figures, create leading lines by streaking clouds, or achieve any other long-exposure effect, blue hour naturally gives you the low light you require.  If it is early blue hour, you might need a polarizer to slow things down enough.  But you won’t normally need heavy neutral density filters & you aren’t forced into using small apertures.
Blue hour in Portland, Oregon.

Blue hour in Portland, Oregon.

      • Blue hour is also the time when you’ll find the moon very low in the sky and making a great photo subject.  An almost full moon and a thin crescent moon both show up low in the sky at blue hour.
      • Blue hour offers a great time to photograph cities and urban areas.  The lights of a city, the light trails of car tail-lights, any artificial lighting is set off nicely against the deep blue of the sky.
Pre-sunrise blue hour in Death Valley, California.

Pre-sunrise blue hour in Death Valley, California.

Blue hour is a pretty easy time to photograph, since exposures are fairly consistent and even, with little contrast to worry about.  But there are definitely some things to keep in mind:

      • First and most important, a tripod is absolutely necessary.  Yes you can shoot a portrait using flash at blue hour and get away without a tripod.  But for landscapes, cityscapes, motion blur, any of these require a good solid tripod.  You will want to use the timer delay or a shutter release cable so you don’t have to touch the camera when it’s taking the picture.  Also, use mirror lockup if your camera has this feature.  It eliminates any possible movement from the mirror moving during the capture.
Blue hour is a great time for a visit to a fair, and a great time to experiment with long exposures.

Blue hour is a great time for a visit to a fair, and a great time to experiment with long exposures.

      • When shooting in the direction of where the sun just went down (or will come up), the sky will be a brighter blue.  You’ll need to handle contrast between the bright sky and your foreground, so I strongly recommend using a graduated neutral density filter.  The contrast is most pronounced early in blue hour, whereas later toward dark you’ll have a more even (and dark) scene.
Mount Hood towers over Lost Lake after sunset.

Mount Hood towers over Lost Lake after sunset.

      • What’s pretty cool about blue hour is that just about the end of blue hour is when you will generally reach the 30-second time limit of most DSLRs, at least at fairly small apertures.  You can switch to bulb mode and have the shutter open for longer than 30 seconds of course, but I have found the magic of blue hour is largely over by this time.  It is replaced by the magic of nighttime and the stars, but that’s a subject for another post.
      • When you are anywhere near water, use it to your advantage.  Not only will it expand the area of beautiful blue, the long exposures will give it a nice silky smooth look.
The Virgin River flowing through Zion Canyon, Utah, makes a great blue-hour subject.

The Virgin River flowing through Zion Canyon, Utah, makes a great blue-hour subject.

      • Be conscious of your long exposures.  When shooting any moving subject (people, boats, etc.) there will be blurring.  This can be a nice effect but it often results in a distraction.  The same is true of the moon, which moves surprisingly fast.  It depends on your focal length, but any shutter speed longer than a few seconds will result in blurring of the moon’s outline and features.  If you zoom in, use shutter speeds shorter than a second.
The full moon rises over Crown Point and the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon.

The full moon rises over Crown Point and the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon.

      • Also with the moon, early blue hour (just after the orange of sunset fades) is best for avoiding contrast.  As blue hour progresses and the sky darkens, the moon will appear much brighter and there will be no chance of getting any detail in it while exposing correctly for the rest of the scene.  Basically, you’ll have the choice of either blowing the moon out (too bright), or exposing correctly for the moon and underexposing the rest of the scene.  There are ways around this.  Check out my post on the subject.
Although there is still some orange in the sky, this scene along the lower Columbia River, Oregon I count as very early blue hour.

Although there is still some orange in the sky, this scene along the lower Columbia River, Oregon I count as very early blue hour.

      • You can jump the gun a bit and get the best of both worlds.  I’m talking about combining some of the color of sunset with the blue hour by shooting right at the short transition between sunset and blue hour.  You can do the same at sunrise by shooting just before the golden color of the rising sun invades the whole sky (see image below).
A very calm dawn at Hutchinson Lake in eastern Washington's Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.

A very calm dawn at Hutchinson Lake in eastern Washington’s Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.

      • Raise your ISO to keep exposures long enough to get the desired effect.  This will likely be necessary only in late blue hour when you are using small apertures for maximum depth of field.  Depending on your camera, you might not be able to raise ISO much without introducing too much noise.  But it’s much better to raise your ISO a stop and get a well-exposed photo than to decrease exposure compensation and have very deep shadows.  Later on the computer, you will see that brightening those deep shadows (to see some of the detail in them) will result in more noise than if you would have raised ISO a bit and gotten a bright enough exposure in the first place.  Don’t go crazy raising your ISO.  The rule of thumb to keep ISO as low as possible still applies.
A clear and cold blue hour skiing near Mt. Hood, Oregon.

A clear and cold blue hour skiing near Mt. Hood, Oregon.

      • Finally, shooting at blue hour demands that you either get out well before the sun rises or stay out well past sunset.  You’ll need to commit to it, through either an early rise or the patience to stick things out past sunset.  No packing up after the sun is down, patience is key.
      • Given the above point, it’s important to be prepared.  Have a good flashlight in your camera bag, and make sure the batteries are charged.  Be very aware of your surroundings.
Blue hour is when many cruise ships depart, but this one in Ensenada, Mexico is staying put.

Blue hour is when many cruise ships depart, but this one in Ensenada, Mexico is staying put.

      • In cities, the gathering darkness of blue hour can be an unsafe time to be in some areas.  In the wilds, at least in some places, being out as dusk turns into darkness can be risky.  You don’t want to present yourself as an easy meal to a hungry predator.  Fortunately, simple precautions can make a big difference.   Don’t position yourself close to any sort of cover; surround yourself with open space instead.  Carry a can of mace, people mace in cities and bear mace in the wild.  Never run from a predator (human or animal really) unless you are sure you can get to the safety of your car, a crowd of people, etc.
Blue hour from within Zion Canyon in Utah.

Blue hour from within Zion Canyon in Utah.

Blue hour can provide a soft edge to hard industrial subjects, such as this gas drilling rig.

Blue hour can provide a soft edge to hard industrial subjects, such as this gas drilling rig.

Photography at blue hour can be a rewarding way to capture moody yet beautiful scenes.  The light is low, allowing for long exposures and smooth, deep colors. But more important is the fact you are at the edge of night, lending a mystical quality to your images.  If you’re interested in any of these images, just click on them to go to my galleries page.  Once you have the full-size version in front of you, click “Purchase Options” to see prices for prints, downloads and more.  They are copyrighted and not available for free download without my permission, sorry.  If you have any questions, just contact me.  Thanks for reading!

Mount Adams, Washington is reflected in Tahklakh Lake at blue hour.

Mount Adams, Washington is reflected in Tahklakh Lake at blue hour.

Wordless Wednesday: Genuine   4 comments

Buckaroo

Quick Trip to the Coast: Part II   8 comments

Low tide at the Oregon Coast

Low tide at the Oregon Coast

This is the second of two parts on a section of the Oregon Coast between Cannon Beach and Depoe Bay.  It’s a part of the coast where you can make a sort of loop from Portland.  Just take Highway 26 west from town and head all the way over to Cannon Beach.  Then travel south on Highway 101 through Tillamook (did somebody say “cheese tour”?) and on to Lincoln City.  Past this large town is a beautiful stretch of coastline to Depoe Bay.  From here you can backtrack to Lincoln City then take Highway 18 back to Portland.

Perched Gull

On the way south to Depoe Bay, a beach stop I can definitely recommend is Fogarty Creek.  This state park has two access points about 1/4 mile from each other; turn east off the highway.  Either one takes you to a large grassy and treed area where you can park and picnic.  But the real show is out on the beach.  Walk the short trail along the pretty creek to a wild beach where you can explore for fossils and agates.  It’s easier to walk north; southward you’ll soon be blocked by a headland in all but very low tides.  The fossil clams and other concretions are very easy to find in the rocks along the beach.

Exploring somewhat inaccessible rocky areas of the Oregon Coast is my favorite thing to do there.

Exploring somewhat inaccessible rocky areas of the Oregon Coast is my favorite thing to do there.

Depoe Bay is one of those little towns that make the Oregon Coast popular with those who like cute towns and plenty of gift shops.  It has an excellent little whale-watch museum/station where volunteers are very eager to show you gray whales if they are visible.  There are also whale-watch tours that leave from the snug little harbor.  You can see them year-round, but spring and late fall are probably best.

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Boiler Bay is a great place to explore.  You will see a sign for it on the left as you drive out of Depoe Bay heading north.  You can pull off and get a view of the bay.  This is a good place to watch for whales.  But to access the shore of the bay for its excellent tide-pooling and exploration you’ll need to do a little more work.

Working your way down this is the first sight of Boiler Bay.

Working your way down this is the first sight of Boiler Bay.

Boiler Bay

Boiler Bay

 Access is impossible from the viewpoint, but if you’re adventurous enough to handle the slippery rocks, you can certainly handle finding the access.  So I won’t spill the beans here (I might anger a local!).  This is the second time I’ve explored down here.  There were a healthy number of tourists up above, but despite the fact they could see me from the viewpoint, I had the bay to myself.

Tidepooling!

Tidepooling!

I see you sea anemone!

I see you sea anemone!

The rocky coastline at Boiler Bay is really only navigable during low tide, and my timing was good in that respect.  Making my way over slippery rocks, around small headlands and into coves where you never know exactly what you’ll find, peering into tidepools at sea-stars, anemones and crabs: this is what I love best to do on our coast.  The old rusty boiler for which this place is named has been sitting in this spot since 1910 when the ship it came from exploded and sank.  For me it made a good subject despite average light for photos.

Boiler Bay

Seastar not starfish!

The old boiler in Boiler Bay is used as a perch by seabirds.

The old boiler in Boiler Bay is used as a perch by seabirds (murres I believe).

What a spectacular place and day!  A couple gray whales were spouting just offshore of the bay mouth.  I watched them for awhile but they were too far for pictures.  This is a fine spot to go tidepooling, and I want to come back for sunset pictures someday, hopefully when we have unusually low tides.  All in all a great foray to the Coast.  Hope you enjoyed the pictures and story.

Edge of Kiwanda

Quick Trip to the Coast: Part I   8 comments

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I rarely go to the Oregon Coast during summer, since it tends to be too busy and also because other times of year (especially early Spring) are generally better for photography.  Recently it’s been on the brain, however, so I decided a quick trip was in order.  I went during the week, but it was still as busy or busier than I like it.  The weather was sunny but windy and a bit on the cool side.

Haystack Rock and Cannon Beach.

Haystack Rock and Cannon Beach.

The typical summertime weather pattern for the coast is morning clouds breaking for brilliant sunshine by mid-day.  The closer to the ocean itself you get, the cooler it is.  Drive inland for 20-30 minutes and the temperature jumps a good 15-20 degrees.  On the beach itself the wind makes it a little chilly but hide behind a dune and you can be in shorts with no shirt and not feel cold.  The highs adjacent to the beach were in the mid- 60s to low-70s (Farenheit) during the day.  At this very same time much of the rest of the U.S. was suffering through incredible heat.  And even Portland just over an hour away was in the mid-90s (but with low humidity).

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In other words, our coast was the place to be, despite the fact that it would have been perfect had it been 10 degrees warmer.  I’d rather be someplace where you need to move it out to feel comfortable in shorts and T-shirt than be where you make any movement whatsoever and you’re drenched in sweat.

I only spent two nights, heading over to Cannon Beach for sunset then down the coast to the Depoe Bay area before heading back.  This section of our north-central coast includes some great natural sights along with several cutesy towns for strolling.  Cannon Beach is scenic but a bit too popular for me.  I headed down to the Manzanita area to spend the first night.  This is not far south of Cannon Beach yet is less crowded and with a bit more of a natural emphasis.  The huge bulk of Neahkahnie Mountain guards the north side of the little town of Manzanita, where you can rent a house for a weekend or week and enjoy a super-wide beach.

Coarse Sand

The hiking here is among the best on the Oregon Coast.  You can do a short but fairly steep hike up Neahkahnie Mountain from either the south or north.  The south side access is up a little dirt road just south of Highway 101’s high point as it traverses up and over the mountain.  The north side trailhead is on the highway across from a pull-out.  You can also hike the opposite way from this point toward the high sea cliffs and down a switchback trail that eventually leads to spectacular Short Sands Beach.

A pond just inland from the coast has abundant water lilies.  Or are these lotus flowers?

A pond just inland from the coast has abundant water lilies. Or are these lotus flowers?

A much shorter trail to Short Sands starts from a bigger and busier parking lot not far north along the highway.  In either case, a trail continues from Short Sands a couple more miles out onto Cape Falcon.  This is a fantastic hike, well worth it.  Short Sands, which has become quite popular with surfers in recent years, occupies a rocky cove marked by dramatically tilted layers of sandstone.  In summer the beach is plenty wide for standard beach goings on.

I like to combine Neahkahnie and Cape Falcon in a longer hike.  A car or bicycle shuttle makes it a very feasible dayhike.  Leave a car at the main Short Sands parking lot then start at the south trailhead for Neahkahnie.  Hike up and over the mountain down to the north trailhead.  Cross the highway and continue down to Short Sands Beach, then out to Cape Falcon.  Return to the Short Sands parking lot where you left your shuttle vehicle.  This  9- or 10-mile hike gives you an outstanding taste of the wilder side of the Oregon Coast.  It’s just the ticket if you have spent too much time wandering through gift shops in Yachats, Seaside or Cannon Beach.

Gray volcanic rocks are smoothed and polished by the surf.

Gray volcanic rocks are smoothed and polished by the surf.

I drove part of the wonderful Three Capes route, a detour from 101 that takes off from Tillamook & rejoins 101 further south.  For photos, I think Cape Kiwanda is the best of the three.  But Cape Lookout certainly has a lot going for it, including a hike out to the tip of the cape and a great campground & beach.  At Kiwanda, I hiked over the big dune marking its south side, where it’s two steps up and one step down.

The view south from Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon Coast.

The view south from Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon Coast.

I scrambled down to the two rocky coves incised into the soft rock of the cape.  This “almost-sandstone” is buff and orange in color, which is partly why this place is so popular with photographers.  In the largest (and most difficult to reach) rocky cove, a spectacular tall archway is only visible if you walk all the way to the northern tip of the cape.

A nice sunset captured earlier this past spring down in one of Cape Kiwanda's rocky inlets.

A nice sunset captured earlier this past spring down in one of Cape Kiwanda’s rocky inlets.

Your reward is a running and hopping descent of the huge dune on the south side of the cape.  A real return to childhood it is, and since it faces the beach you’ll have an audience!  A further reward is had adjacent to the beach, where friendlies at Pelican Bay Brewery are ready to pour you a mega-pint of IPA (the p standing for pelican not pale).  This little travelogue of the Oregon Coast continues next time with the second of two parts, so stay tuned.  Thanks for reading!

The sea stacks just offshore of Cannon Beach, Oregon are set against a peaceful summer sunset.

The sea stacks just offshore of Cannon Beach, Oregon are set against a peaceful summer sunset.

Single-Image Sunday: The Golden Years   8 comments

Thinking about the old days: my dog Charl

Thinking about the good old days: my dog Charl

My little buddy Charl the shih tsu, who I’ve known since he was a pup, is now in his golden years.  He is 15 and has been slowing way down lately.  He is pretty much blind now but shows no worrisome signs of ill health.  He’s been a remarkably healthy dog.

Although this photo is from last year, I chose it because he seems to be thinking back on the good times we’ve shared together.  He used to be one heck of a hiker, believe it or not.  With the most unique personality of any dog I’ve encountered, he’s been a constant source of amusement through the years.  I’m going to miss him when he goes.

Friday Foto Talk: Travel Photography, Part III   9 comments

An empty beach invites exploration on Costa Rica's remote Osa Peninsula.

An empty beach invites exploration on Costa Rica’s remote Osa Peninsula.

This is the third and final installment in this series on travel photography tips.  I hope you’ve enjoyed and gotten something out of them.  Check out Part I and Part II if you haven’t already.  If you are interested in any of the pictures just click on them and you will see options for purchase of the high-resolution versions.  Please contact me if you have any questions.

      • What to Photograph:  You should have done some research on what to seek out and photograph while on your trip.  But if you didn’t do much, so what?  Just hit up a gift shop when you arrive and check out the postcards.  They will tell you what is often photographed in that place.  You might not want to take most of those pictures, but it is only a good thing to know what they are.  Don’t be shy, ask questions about the subjects in the pictures.  Hit up the proprietor or buy the card(s) and approach locals on the street with questions about what’s pictured.  This can yield much more than how to get to the particular spot.  Think of postcards as springboards for further exploration.

A boy in a village in northern India gazes with a peculiar intensity.

      • Roaming & People Pics:  I mentioned wandering above, but I want to stress that there is one good reason that a plan is not really necessary.  That reason is people.  There are almost certainly going to be people anywhere you go, and they are endlessly fascinating subjects for your pictures.  While I am normally quite reserved around home, I open up on the road.  Especially in different countries, I’m willing to sort of make a fool of myself.  I approach people readily, perhaps make a joke, and ask to take some photographs.  Most say yes.  Sometimes I even take their picture first then go up and explain why I just took their picture.  My reason is usually flattering.  As you might know, flattery will get you everywhere.

Two young Sherpa friends haul equipment on the trail to Namche Bazaar in Nepal.

      • Children:  I hate seeing tourists with cameras converge on kids and you see the kids aren’t into it.  It’s one thing if a group of laughing children approach you and ham it up.  But you should always ask about and look for their parents.  Ask the parents if it’s okay first.  Just don’t be one of those doofuses in the Himalayan village cornering a couple young friends just being themselves and feeling slightly threatened by all the pasty tourists pressing in with their cameras.

Upon waking very early on only my 3rd morning in Africa, I stepped outside to see this stately female Thornicroft's giraffe in Zambia's South Luangwa National Park.

      • Elderly:  There is a sort of axiom out there about travel photography that kids and old people are what you should focus on.  This might be true as far as the impact of the images, but I don’t generally go along with it.  I think there are all sorts of interesting people out there: young, old and in between.  But kids and the elderly are probably most likely to have the time to give you.  Just don’t treat the elderly like some people treat kids – as if they have no real say in the situation.  Treat everybody the same, with respect for them and their time.

A woman in the Himalaya of Nepal is proud of her vegetable garden, and her grandson.

      • Communication:  A nice smile and willingness to chat is always good.  Sometimes language is a barrier.  But you can just share what pictures you’ve taken with them (via the LCD) and have a laugh.  It’s important to make some kind of connection, and make clear from the beginning that you’re into taking pictures.  Don’t be shy about that.

In Etosha, Namibia, my patience paid off.  After 2+ months in Africa, I had not seen a cheetah.  Then I happened on a mother and these two cuties.

      • Sharing:  It goes without saying, if you promise to send pictures of people that you’ve taken, you need to follow through.  Doing it while on the road is the best option.  But I carry a Polaroid Pogo printer, a pocket-sized printer that uses no ink and connects directly to my DSLR via a mini-USB cable.  It produces wallet-sized prints.  I give out prints for people who cooperate and with whom I’ve spent time.  I don’t go crazy (you can only carry so much paper), but it has greased many a wheel believe me.  I just found out, however, that they have almost quadrupled the price on these.  The new ones have bluetooth, but I paid $45 and they are now about $160!  I can’t really recommend this thing (which produces, after all, rather poor quality prints) at that new price.  But if you can find an older one, go for it.

The spectacular peak of Taboche looms above the trekking route to Everest Base Camp in Nepal.

      • Money:  Should you pay for pictures or not?  If a person is dressed up like his ancestors and is accompanied by a bored animal, you can bet you need to.  But in most cases it’s optional; always has been.  I don’t generally do it.  But since in the case of other countries (where you are more likely to be asked to pay) the people I want to photograph are on the street and thus may likely be selling something, I will simply buy something from them.  Then I’m not some tourist with a camera but a customer.  Or if they ask for money I might offer them a small print (from the Pogo – see above), explaining that it’s not my “thing” to pay for photos.  Like all rules, this rule of mine has exceptions, but I try pretty hard to stick to it.

An attractive couple of locals from the Nicaraguan island of Omotepe take a break from riding their horses in a local parade.

      • Relax:  I think everyone should read Tao de Ching before they travel.  Trust me I’ve tried too hard when traveling, usually only for the first couple days though.  Just take it as it comes.  If it rains, get an umbrella and shoot interesting city stuff.  If it’s hot get out early and late, taking advantage of “pool light” in the mid-day.  Shoot what interests you in the place you’re in and don’t stress about things.  You want to have a good time on your trip, so you should be willing to miss some shots and keep your “let the good times roll” vibe in place.  For one thing, you’ll get better people shots with a fun carefree attitude.  Have fun!

A lone jet skier motors across Lake Powell, Arizona at dusk.

Okay, I’m tired of this subject for now.  There is more, probably much more, to say on this subject.  If you have something to add, or any questions, let it fly!  I’ll probably be posting on this subject in the future, and many of my posts are travel-related anyway.  Thanks for reading!

A relaxing walk on the beach is a great way to take life easy when on the road.  Get a picture while you're at it.

Wordless Wednesday: The Burden   Leave a comment

Flores

Flores

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