The Maya III   Leave a comment

Dugout canoes are a common sight alonf the Rio Dulce in southeast Guatemala.

A continuation of my journey into the land of the Maya, where I visited every country in Central America.  After the highlands of Guatemala, I traveled through southeastern Guatemala, then into Belize, looping back through Guatemala and down into El Salvador.  I then went on to Honduras, finally leaving the land of the Maya when I continued into Nicaragua.

Guatemala

A boy who would not leave me alone until I befriended him on the western shore of Lago Izabel, Guatemala.

Lake Izabel in Guatemala is not as beautiful as Lake Atitlan, but it doesn’t have the tourist traffic either.  The town of El Estor, on the steamy lakeshore at the west end of the lake, is a haven for wildlife, including dugongs (like manatees).  You can simply ask around down at the lake to find someone who will take you out on their boat.  Just make sure he takes you well up the Rio Polochic.  You will certainly get close to howler monkeys, and you might see spider monkeys (which are probably my favorite monkey) as well.

The Rio Dulce connects Izabel with the Caribbean at Livingston (where you can either head into Belize or Honduras).  Here you are back on the “gringo trail”, which doesn’t mean it’s not beautiful, but make sure you check out Izabel’s western end too.  You take a small tour boat/ferry from the busy town of Rio Dulce to the coast.  There are several jungle lodges to stay in about halfway along, so if you have a couple days I would not go all the way to Livingston in one go.

Instead, enjoy the slow pace of life along these quiet tropical waterways, watching local fishermen in dugout canoes, doing a little hiking & birdwatching, and swimming.  I stayed at Finca Tatin, & my little jungle chalet (complete with outdoor rock shower) was named Tucano.  I can definitely recommend this place.  It’s popular with backpackers, but I don’t hold that against it – too much!

I’ll skip over my diving adventures in Belize.  I love diving in the Caribe, but Belize, along its coast at least, is not my favorite part of Central America.  The wilderness and Mayan ruins of western Belize however, are a different story.  The people are quite friendly in Belize, but I can’t say I’m impressed.  The poor Belizean women, they have to put up with men who don’t do much, just drinking beer most of the day and hanging out.

When leaving Belize the cabbie warned me to be careful in Guatemala.  I told him I’d already spent about a month there and felt safer than on the streets of larger towns in Belize.  It’s true.  At night the drunk guys hanging about are rather unsavory.  Of course Guatemala City & Antigua can present dangers too.

I rented a little motorbike of questionable quality in the town of San Ignacio (also called Cayo), which is the tourist basecamp for western Belize.  Central America, unlike most of Asia, is not a place where one can easily rent scooters & motorbikes.  Too bad, because it is perfect for that.  I had to resort to finding a repair shop and talked them into renting me one of their supposedly finished “projects”.

So I set off on the bike into the stupendous Mountain Pine Ridge Reserve, a huge plateau covered in pine forest, and graced by beautiful waterfalls and caves.  What a day of exploring!  I only saw a few jeeps.  The roads are rough but passable.  The sun was rapidly setting as I was racing back, when the front wheel turned without the handlebars doing so.  Not good!  I wiped out big time, but luckily got only a few scratches and scrapes.  I had to straighten the wheel with brute force, and take it very easy the rest of the way.  Lucky it was so late when I returned it nobody was around.  The bike had a fender hanging off, plus assorted other dings.

Guatemala

Tropical jungle surrounds my cabin at Finca Tatin, along the Rio Dulce in Guatemala.

Belize

My transport while diving on the coast of Belize.

Just before reaching Guatemala, near the town of San Jose Succotz, overlooking a beautiful river (the Mopan), lie the ruins of Xunantunich (pronounce CHEW-nahn-too-neech).  These Mayan ruins are relatively small, especially when compared to massive Tikal just across the border in Guatemala.  But they are beautiful, with a fantastic temple (El Castillo) that you can climb for outstanding views extending into Guatemala.  You have to cross the river on a hand-cranked ferry, then it’s a shortish walk up to the ruins.  I went towards day’s end, & ended up alone at the top of El Castillo as the sun was setting.  What a feeling!

Belize

Thousand Foot Falls in the Mountain Pine Ridge Reserve of western Belize is actually 1600 feet high and is the highest waterfall in Central America.

I stayed nearby in a quirky place I sadly forget the name of.  But if you’re there be observant at the east end of San Jose Succotz, you’ll see it up on the hill, or its sign claiming it’s an eco-“resort”.  I don’t care if they exaggerate about their status as a resort, it is an extremely relaxing and low-key place.  Very cheap too.

Belize

El Castillo is a temple at the Mayan ruins of Xunantunich in western Belize.

Well I crossed into Guatemala on my way to Tikal, but this is getting lengthy, so I’ll save that for next time.

Belize

The temple of El Castillo in western Belize basks in lonely late-day light.

 

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